Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

Norway

Presented by Steve Bloomfield, this is Monocle 24’s flagship global-affairs show featuring interviews with political leaders and in-depth analysis of the big issues of the day.

Episodes

Explainer 45: Does Canada have the best immigration system?  

Since the election of Justin Trudeau in 2015, the world has been reminded of Canada’s liberalism and compassion. And this is not limited to refugees: it’s reflected in their broader immigration policy too.

The French left  

President François Hollande has an approval rating of 4 per cent and it’s hard to see how any of the leading Socialists candidates can make it into the second round of next spring’s presidential election. So how did the French left get into this mess and what would it take for it to rise again?

Explainer 44: Italy’s referendum  

What it’s meant to be about – and what it’s really about.

Ghana votes  

A presidential election in Ghana doesn’t tend to get much coverage in western media and the reason is very simple: it tends to run smoothly. Unlike many of its neighbours it's a real democracy – power has changed hands between political parties. The country goes to the polls again next month so who are the candidates and what will it mean for the region?

Explainer 43: The problem with ‘identity politics’  

‘Identity politics’ is being blamed for Hillary Clinton’s defeat – executive editor Steve Bloomfield explains why it shouldn’t be.

The Foreign Desk Live  

Last Tuesday we hosted a special edition of ‘The Foreign Desk Live’ from our London HQ in front of a sold-out audience. The topic? Donald Trump and what his election means for the rest of the world. Steve Bloomfield was joined on stage by Bill Emmott, Xenia Wickett, Sir William Patey and Steven Erlanger.

Explainer 42: Why – and how – liberals can fight back  

It has not been a good few months for liberals, who have been castigated and branded as being out of touch with people’s real concerns. Right now, liberals are losing and have to fight back.

Donald Trump won. So, what next?  

It happened. Donald Trump is set to be the next president of the US. But what does it all mean? Our editors and correspondents around the world describe the impact that Trump’s victory has had in their cities; as with all first thoughts, this is as emotional as it is analytical.


Join us at Midori House in London on Tuesday 15 November for a special live recording of The Foreign Desk. For details and to book tickets visit https://monocle.com/events/the-foreign-desk-live/.

Explainer 41: Donald Trump and the Democrats  

Following the Republican nominee’s win, our New York bureau chief Ed Stocker looks at what a Donald Trump presidency means for the Democrats.


Join us at Midori House in London on Tuesday 15 November for a special live recording of The Foreign Desk. For details and to book tickets visit https://monocle.com/events/the-foreign-desk-live/.

The Philippines and the rest of the world  

There is more to Rodrigo Duterte, the new president of the Philippines, than the cartoon character he is often depicted as. And his rhetorical shift away from the US and towards China might turn out to be popular too. We ask who Duterte really is and what his presidency means for the Philippines’ relationship with the rest of the world.


Join us at Midori House in London on Tuesday 15 November for a special live recording of The Foreign Desk. For details and to book tickets visit https://monocle.com/events/the-foreign-desk-live/.

Explainer 40: One year of Justin Trudeau  

As Justin Trudeau marks one year in office, our Toronto bureau chief Tomos Lewis looks back at the highs and lows of the prime minister’s past 12 months.


Join us at Midori House in London on Tuesday 15 November for a special live recording of The Foreign Desk. For details and to book tickets visit https://monocle.com/events/the-foreign-desk-live/.

Foreign correspondents in the US election  

There are more than 1,500 foreign correspondents based in the US and hundreds more have flooded in to cover the country’s upcoming election. This week we speak to five of them to find out why the election has aroused so much interest at home and how it’s affected their faith in democracy.


Join us at Midori House in London on Tuesday 15 November for a special live recording of The Foreign Desk. For details and to book tickets visit https://monocle.com/events/the-foreign-desk-live/.

Explainer 39: how to plan and police a protest  

Two years after the Umbrella Movement took place in Hong Kong, our bureau chief James Chambers reflects on how to plan – and police – a protest in the city.

What’s missing from the US elections?  

Let’s be honest, this has been a horrible American election. And while they are never bloodless discussions about policy, it would be nice to talk about some of the issues that really matter. So this week we do talk about them: healthcare, education and gun control.

Explainer 38: How the US votes  

Scores of Americans have already voted thanks to many states that facilitate early voting. But once you’ve actually cast your vote, how much it counts really depends on where you are in the country.

Somalia votes  

Somalia has been without a functioning government for more than 25 years. The fact that it is about to hold a presidential election should be seen as progress but the more you learn about how the election works the less excited you’ll be.

Explainer 37: Japan and Russia’s dispute over the Kuril Islands  

In December Russian president Vladimir Putin will fly to Nagato for a summit with Japanese PM Shinzo Abe. Ending Tokyo’s longstanding dispute with Moscow over the southern Kuril Islands will be a top priority. We discuss why.

Who is António Guterres?  

António Guterres will be the next secretary-general of the UN. His appointment was surprising in a number of ways – for a start, he had the full public support of the Security Council. But it was also surprising because he’s no pushover. What sort of secretary-general will he turn out to be?

Explainer 36: Is Turkey’s future in Nato?  

Although Turkey has been in Nato for more than 60 years and has its second-largest armed forces it has never felt entirely welcome. As President Erdogan rows with the West and makes friends with Russia, we ask whether his country’s future is in Nato.

The Dutch and the far-right  

Next year one of the most liberal nations in the world, the Netherlands, will hold an election that could see a far-right politician come out on top. We learn how even if Geert Wilders wins it doesn’t necessarily mean he’ll become prime minister.

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose