My Favorite Album with Jeremy Dylan

My Favorite Album with Jeremy Dylan

Germany

Each week filmmaker Jeremy Dylan chats with a musician/songwriter about their favorite album of all time - the songs, the history and how it has influenced their own music.

Episodes

172. Slate's Jack Hamilton on Stevie Wonder 'Innvervisions' (1973)  

Slate media critic Jack Hamilton joins me to discuss Stevie Wonder's sometimes overlooked classic album 'Innervisions', how it showcases Stevie's political side, how he balanced sophisticated artistry with massive commercial success, the Red Hot Chilli Peppers version of 'Higher Ground' and the remarkable dynamic Stevie has with his live audiences and what we might expect from Stevie in the age of Trump

Buy Jack's excellent book 'Just Around Midnight: Rock'n'Roll and the Racial Imagination' if you care at all about pop music, pop culture or knowing things.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

Blake Masters on Drive-By Truckers 'The Dirty South' (2004)  

Writer/producer Blake Masters (Falling Water, 2 Guns, Brotherhood) steps out of his edit suite to talk about the Drive By-Truckers 2004 masterwork 'the Dirty South'.

We talk about way the album plays to the strengths of the bands three songwriters - Patterson Hood, Mike Cooley and Jason Isbell, the continuing resonance of the Truckers work post-Trump, how they played against the stereotypes of a Southern Rock band, writing empathetic songs about 'bad guys' and how rock music is used in TV shows. Plus Blake and I hatch plans for a TV series based on the album.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

 

170. Dawes' Taylor Goldsmith on their new album 'We're All Gonna Die', loving LA and the albums that inspire him  

Presenting a conversation between myself and Dawes frontman Taylor Goldsmith, on bulletproof coffee, how welcoming ex-bandmate Blake Mills into the producer chair changed the band's approach to record making for "We're All Gonna Die", why the hipsters are wrong about LA, the albums that have been his biggest inspiration and whether he feels like part of a creative community.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

169. Sadler Vaden on Rolling Stones 'Goats Head Soup' (1973)  

Singer/songwriter Sadler Vaden, guitarist with Jason Isbell's 400 Unit and ambassador for the timeless spirit of rock'n'roll, joins me to shine a light on an underrated classic from the Rolling Stones catalogue, 1973's Goats Head Soup

Why has this album always lived in the shadow of Exile on Main St? How did the guest musicians like Billy Preston influence these songs? Do Sadler and Jason Isbell fight over what the best Stones album is? Which song of Sadler's is directly inspired by 'Angie'? Why did the Stones record Goats Head Soup in Jamaica? Why don't the Stones play most of these songs live? What lyric in 'Winter' has Sadler been mishearing for years, and how does The Wire fit in?

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

168. Guy Clark biographer Tamara Saviano on 'Dublin Blues' and Guy's legacy  

Guy Clark biographer Tamara Saviano joins me to discuss Guy's classic album 'Dublin Blues', which artists are carrying on Guy's legacy, his impact on the development of Americana music, Guy's relationships with his wife and muse Suzannah and friend and co-writer Rodney Crowell, the timeless quality of Guy's songwriting, how Guy and his friends used their music to talk to each other and why Tamara hasn't been able to listen to Guy's music since he passed away earlier this year.

'Without Getting Killed or Caught' by Tamara Saviano is out now.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

166. The 5th Beatle Sir George Martin - A tribute with Davey Lane and Brett Wolfie  

What made Sir George Martin the Fifth Beatle? As a tribute to the late, legendary record producer, I sit down with Davey Lane (You Am I) and drummer Brett Wolfie to talk about Martin's contributions to the greatest pop records ever made. We delve into:

- The tough decision he forced them to make that changed the band forever
- How Martin's arranging skills made Can't Buy Me Love a hit
- Sir George's contribution as a musician on tracks like A Hard Day's Night, Long Tall Sally and In My Life
- How his background in making comedy records with Peter Sellers helped him make 'Being for the Benefit of Mr Kite'
- Why he walked out during the White Album sessions
- The production advice George Martin once gave me
- The George Martin tribue show Davey and Brett played together earlier this year
- The unusual covers of Beatles songs Martin produced later on in his career
- The time that John Lennon asked George to do the impossible, and how he did it
and more...

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

 

REPOST - Rose Elinor Dougall on Broadcast 'Tender Buttons' (2005)  

Reposting this great chat with Rose Elinor Dougall on the occasion of her long-awaited (at least by us) new music, which you can find on her Facebook page.

English singer-songwriter Rose Elinor Dougall joins host Jeremy Dylan to explain her love for “Tender Buttons”, the 2005 album from indie electronica band Broadcast.

Rose reveals how she discovered the record while still part of The Pippettes, how the superficial differences and deeper similarities influenced the path she’s taken as a solo artist, the distinctive Englishness that ties her together with late Broadcast frontwoman Trish Keenan and the dynamic balance between her more organic solo work and her collaborations with Mark Ronson.

Listen in the player above or download the episode by clicking here.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed - http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

165. John Oates on Joni Mitchell 'Blue' (1971)  

Legendary songwriter, singer, guitarist (and half of iconic duo Hall & Oates) John Oates on the album he holds as the gold standard of record-making, Joni Mitchell’s indelible classic ‘Blue’.

We talk about the impact the album had on John as he began working on the first Hall & Oates album, his experiences crossing paths with Joni through the years, why he considers her a brave songwriter, her connections to modern day confessional songwriters like Taylor Swift, why this had to be Joni’s fourth album and what the H&O classic ‘Maneater’ is really about.

 

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

 

164. Jimmy Vivino on 23 years with Conan O'Brien, country music today and the future of rock'n'roll  

In a break with the regular show format, I’m bringing you a great conversation with legendary guitarist and bandleader Jimmy Vivino, backstage at the Conan, where he leads the Basic Cable Band. We taped this after our podcast on the classic ‘Super Session’ album (episode 122 of this show).

We talk about the origins and evolution of the Max Weinberg Seven (while Springsteen’s E Street Band were on hiatus) and its transformation into the Basic Cable Band, how he’s helped fellow “music head” Conan O’Brien develop as a guitarist during their 23 years of friendship, if he and Conan ever compete for rare guitars, how he looks back on the tumultuous split with NBC and how it reflects the changes in the music business.

We also chat about country music’s transformation into ‘AOR Rock’ and his concerns about the future of rock’n’roll, Jimmy tells a great Bill Monroe story from via Sam Bush, we discuss why music fans won’t let artists evolve, and why acoustic guitar legend Tommy Emmanuel makes him want to get a job at Starbucks.

Listen in the player above or download the episode by clicking here.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed -http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

REPOST - Jason Isbell on The Rolling Stones 'Sticky Fingers', what he misses about the Drive By Truckers and meeting the Boss  

Reposting one of my favorite episodes to celebrate #InternationalPodcastDay

One of today’s most renowned and skilful Americana singer-songwriters, Jason Isbell, talks about a classic record that helped inspire the genre - The Rolling Stones 1971 LP ‘Sticky Fingers’.

We talk about how growing up around Muscle Shoals Alabama got Jason into the record as a child the album, how shows the Stones maturing as a band as they entered the 70s, why the self-destructive lyrics of ‘Sway’resonated with Jason as he endured his own struggles, what he misses about being in the Drive By Truckers, which song from ‘Southeastern’ was inspired by the Stones, how Jason, the Truckers and the Stones used their business acumen to assert creative control and whether authenticity matters.

Plus Jason reveals special moment when he met Bruce Springsteen recently backstage at New Orleans Jazz Festival, and we argue over the merits of the ganjo and producer Dave Cobb’s wardrobe.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

 

163. DJ Alix Brown on Lou Reed's 'Transformer' (1972)  

DJ, serial band member (from the Angry Angles to Roya and many many more), stylist and quintessential New York transplant Alix Brown invites me into her NYC home for a conversation about the quintessential New York album (recorded in London) - Lou Reed's 1972 'Transformer'.

We talk about how Reed working with producer David Bowie was the culmination of a transatlantic tennis match the Velvet Underground had started in the 60s, why Alix avoided meeting Lou Reed in person, whether there's any of Lou Reed's New York left today, Alix's abandoned VU cover project and working with Mick Rock (who shot the Transformer album cover) soon after Reed's death.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

REPOST - Emma Swift on Lucinda Williams 'Car Wheels on a Gravel Road'  

On the eve of the Americana Music Festival, singer-songwriter and Double J disk jockey Emma Swift drops into the podbooth to chat with host Jeremy Dylan about one of the seminal Americana albums of the 90s -Car Wheels on a Gravel Road by Lucinda Williams.

Along the way they break down classic songs Right On Time, Can’t Let Go, 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten, Joy and Metal Firecracker and talk about the album’s tumultuous production process, the intimacy of Lucinda’s lyrics, why Jim Lauderdale is a genius harmony singer and Emma closes the episode with a beautiful acoustic rendition one of the album’s best songs - Greenville.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He has directed the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins and the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

REPOST - Tim Rogers (You Am I) on John Hiatt 'Bring the Family' (1986)  

The best nose in Aussie rock and frontman of legendary racket-makers You Am I, Tim Rogers, joins hostJeremy Dylan to reveal his surprising pick for his favorite album - John Hiatt’s 1987 breakthrough “Bring the Family”, which featured songs like ‘Thing Called Love’ and ‘Have A Little Faith In Me’.

Why did the album that made middle-age cool give Tim hope as a troubled teen? How did the all-star band that play on the album come together? Why did their follow up project Little Village fall apart? What are the boundaries when writing songs about your family members? Why is John Hiatt so damn sexy?

Plus Tim addresses the story Jon Auer told back in episode 17 about Tim saving his life during the sessions for Tim’s classic “Hi Fi Way” album and talks about why touring with Nick Lowe solidified his love for the man and why he turned down the chance to write with Kinks legend Ray Davies.

Listen in the player above or download the episode by clicking here.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed -http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

162. Taylor Locke on The Pixies 'Doolittle', the album that inspired the 90s alt rock movement  

Taylor Locke, co-founder of Rooney, Lindsay Buckingham in world renowned celebration of Fleetwood Mac "Rumors", producer, studio owner and frontman of garage-pop outfit 'The Great Indoors', joins me to open the lid on the Pixies classic 'Doolittle' and how it shows them bursting out of their genre confines to make an pure rock classic LP.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

161. Harts on Prince 'Around the World In A Day' and his time at Paisley Park with the Purple One  

Melbourne singer/songwriter and ascendant guitar god Harts returns to the show to talk Prince's follow up to 'Purple Rain' and dive deep on his relationship with Prince, jamming at Paisley Park, the compliment that made Prince cringe and how Prince's death has changed the experience of listening to his records.

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

REPOST - Robyn Hitchcock on John Lennon 'Plastic Ono Band'  

This episode was originally posted January 22, 2015

Traveler through space and time, British cult icon, Soft Boys frontman and legendary singer-songwriter Robyn Hitchcock steers his ship into the podbooth this week, for a chat with host Jeremy Dylan about John Lennon’s emotionally confronting classic 1970 album “Plastic Ono Band”.

Along the way, they talk about why Robyn identified with Lennon as a kid, Lennon’s antipathy toward his Beatles music, the possible influence of Bob Dylan’s “John Wesley Harding” album, John and Yoko’s primal scream therapy and which Robyn Hitchcock song borrows its arrangement from a Plastic Ono Band tune.

Listen in the player above or download the episode by clicking here.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed - http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker from Sydney, Australia who has worked in the music industry since 2007. He directed the the feature music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts (out now!) and the feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, in addition to many commercials and music videos.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

160. Mark McKinnon on Kris Kristofferson, music vs politics & programming the President's iPod  

Political strategist and co-host of the Circus, Mark McKinnon has spent decades in the A-league of 'showbusiness for ugly people', including as chief media strategist for President George W Bush. But before that, he was a singer-songwriter whose band caught the ear of Kris Kristofferson. Mark talks about how Kristofferson's most iconic songs shook up country music, living in Kristofferson's Nashville apartment in the 70s and trying to keep up with his lifestyle, what politicians could learn from great musicians, 'authenticity', when Elvis Presley almost recorded one of his songs and programming President Bush's iPod.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed -http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

159. Alan Brough on masculinity, punk and how The Blue Nile got him through a difficult teenage  

Comedian, author, actor, Spicks and Specks team captain - Alan Brough's favorite album found him years before any of those careers, when he was a self-described 'crazy' teenager. This is the story of how an obscure Scottish post-punk band helped him find a new way of being a man and get through his adolescence.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed - http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

158. Jim Lauderdale and why we need Americana (w/ Peter Cooper of the Country Music Hall of Fame)  

#RoadToAmericanaFest

Journalist and singer-songwriter Peter Cooper of the Country Music Hall of Fame joins me to talk about Jim Lauderdale's classic 'Pretty Close to the Truth' album and how the changes in country music in the 90s created the need for the Americana music genre, the migration of people like Jim and Buddy Miller from California to Nashville and how Jim helped Peter propose to his wife.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes here or in other podcasting apps by copying/pasting our RSS feed -http://myfavoritealbum.libsyn.com/rss

My Favorite Album is a podcast unpacking the great works of pop music. Each episode features a different songwriter or musician discussing their favorite album of all time - their history with it, the making of the album, individual songs and the album’s influence on their own music.

Jeremy Dylan is a filmmaker, journalist and photographer from Sydney, Australia. He directed the music documentary Jim Lauderdale: The King of Broken Hearts and feature film Benjamin Sniddlegrass and the Cauldron of Penguins, and writes for Capital News magazine.

If you’ve got any feedback or suggestions, drop us a line at myfavoritealbumpodcast@gmail.com.

 

0:00/0:00
Video player is in betaClose