The Film Programme

The Film Programme

United Kingdom

The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world

Episodes

Blue Velvet  

Francine Stock revisits the manicured lawns and gothic horror of Blue Velvet as David Lynch's surreal masterpiece celebrates its thirtieth anniversary. She is accompanied on her journey to the heart of suburban darkness by critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey.

A Tale of Two Picture Houses  

Francine Stock visits Campbeltown on the west coast of Scotland where the community have come together to save their art deco cinema, The Picture House, one of the most architecturally important in Europe, from terminal decline. The Uckfield Picture House celebrates its centenary this month and for over fifty years it's been owned by one family. Kevin Markwick has been with the cinema since he was babe in arms and talks about his life in pictures.

James Schamus  

Producer, writer, professor and former studio boss James Schamus tells Francine Stock why he took the plunge and directed his first film, Inidgnation, after three decades in the business. In an exclusive interview, award-winning writer/director Carol Morley reveals what her next project will be, even before a word is written or a scene is filmed.

Napoleon and I  

Historian Kevin Brownlow tells Francine Stock about his 50 year quest to restore Abel Gance's silent masterpiece Napoleon to its five and half hour glory, and why the search for missing scenes still continues even though the film is about to be released on DVD for the very first time. Composer Carl Davis takes us through his score, which borrows freely from the work of Beethoven, who dedicated his 3rd Symphony to Napoleon, only to regret it later.

Tom Ford  

With Francine Stock Fashion designer and movie director Tom Ford discusses his film-within-a-film Nocturnal Animals, and explains why he doesn't like to mix his two professions. As The Light Between Oceans has audiences weeping in the aisles, director Derek Cianfrance talks tear-jerkers and tragedy. Critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey reveal the films that have made them blub like babies.

Jacqueline Bisset  

With Francine Stock. Jacqueline Bisset looks back at Day For Night, Francois Truffaut's Oscar-winning movie about movie-making. She reveals why she refuses "to whinge" about the roles offered to older women. Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh enter the strange world of the film within a film, from Singin' In The Rain to Hail Caesar. FanGirl Quest, aka Tiia Ohman and Satu Walden, explain why they have travelled the globe from their native Finland to seek out famous locations and practice something they call "scene framing".

David Oyelowo  

With Francine Stock. Actor and producer David Oyelowo outlines his plans to revolutionize the British film industry and to make films that are genuinely diverse and reflective of the United Kingdom. Oyelowo argues that industry orthodoxies about what audiences want are "lies". And he explains why his son assumed that he would be playing the best friend, and not the male lead, in his new film The Queen Of Katwe. Francine visits Mouth That Roars, an organisation based in Hackney which trains teenagers in film production, many of whom are from communities that are under-represented in British Cinema. Denise Rose explains how her company is trying to redress the balance. The result of the BFI poll to find the best loved performance by a black star is announced exclusively on the programme.

Andrea Arnold  

With Francine Stock. British director Andrea Arnold discusses her own trip across the United States that inspired her road movie American Honey, and reveals how she discovered her star, Sasha Lane, on a beach in Miami. Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh get their motors running and head out on the highway as they chart the progress of the American road movie. Producer Rebecca O'Brien discusses her collaboration with Ken Loach that has spanned a quarter of a century and is marked by a new, typically hard-hitting and award-winning drama I, Daniel Blake.

Black Star  

With Francine Stock. The Film Programme has teamed up with the BFI on a poll to decide the best performance by a black actor of all time. Among the nominees is Earl Cameron in Pool Of London, the first British movie to star a Caribbean actor. Francine hears from Earl about a career that has spanned over six decades and includes a Bond pic. Neil Brand reveals how modern technology helps him score a silent version of Robin Hood from 1922. Four translators discuss the subtle art of sub-titling.

Tim Burton  

Francine Stock enters Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children with Tim Burton. The director reveals why he loves Blackpool so much and why its pleasure beach reflects his state of mind. Director Babak Anvari reveals how much his horror movie, Under The Shadow, set in the Iran-Iraq war, is autobiographical. The director of When Marnie Was There discusses the popularity of British children's literature in Japan. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey takes us through the history of peculiar children in cinema.

David Arnold  

With Francine Stock A soundtrack special with David Arnold's notes on Independence Day, which has more saluting than any other movie, according to the composer. Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp discuss their new score for Carl Dreyer's silent masterpiece The Passion Of Joan Of Arc. Neil Brand reveals how John Williams put the magic into Harry Potter.

Colin Firth, Ralph Fiennes  

Colin Firth and Francine Stock indulge in some Bridget Jones's Baby talk, and the actor admits that he is partly to blame for the out-dated stereotype of the reticent Englishman. Ralph Fiennes explains why he spent two months learning Russian for his role in Two Women. Francine follows the continuing adventures of Alastair Till and Suzie Sinclair who left the Big Smoke for the sea air of Cornwall, and built their own cinema, without any previous knowledge of the film business. The Newlyn Filmhouse has been open for six months, so is it still a dream factory or waking nightmare ?

Kubo And The Two Strings, Hell Or High Water  

With Francine Stock. The spirit of Ray Harryhausen is invoked in a new stop-motion animation Kubo And The Two Strings, which boasts the largest stop-motion puppet in animation history, standing 16 feet tall. The director Travis Knight explains why the film took five years to make. Scottish director David Mackenzie reveals how he came to make an all-American crime thriller set deep in the heart of Texas, Hell Or High Water. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey follow the trail of the film's antecedents. Screenwriter Paul Mayersberg explains why the film studio pulled out of The Man Who Fell To Earth when they discovered David Bowie wasn't going to sing on the soundtrack.

Kubo And The Two Strings; Hell Or High Water  

Kubo And The Two Strings; Hell Or High Water With Francine Stock. The spirit of Ray Harryhausen is invoked in a new stop-motion animation Kubo And The Two Strings, which boasts the largest stop-motion puppet in animation history, standing 16 feet tall. The director Travis Knight explains why the film took five years to make. Scottish director David Mackenzie reveals how he came to make an all-American crime thriller set deep in the heart of Texas, Hell Or High Water. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey follow the trail of the film's antecedents. Screenwriter Paul Mayersberg explains why the film studio pulled out of The Man Who Fell To Earth when they discovered David Bowie wasn't going to sing on the soundtrack.

The Choir That Sang Elvish  

With Antonia Quirke. Antonia meets London Voices, the choir that supply the voices to the soundtracks of blockbusters such as The Lord Of The Rings, Spectre and Iron Man 2. Poet Don Paterson concludes his series on great movie speeches with James Stewart drunkenly telling Katherine Hepburn that she has "fires banked down inside" in The Philadelphia Story. Andy Mitchell nominates his father Andrew as an unsung hero of British cinema - he was in charge of Elstree Studios in the 1980s when six of the top ten grossing moves of all time were made in Borehamwood.

Save Our Cinemas  

With Antonia Quirke. Antonia meets two groups who are trying to save their local cinemas in Deptford and Homerton and hears from a local trust in Aberfeldy who successfully saved theirs and are still going strong after four years. Poet Don Paterson continues his series on great movie speeches with Jack Nicholson bawling "you can't handle the truth!" in A Few Good Men.

Swallows and Amazons  

With Antonia Quirke. Antonia is joined by 18 year old vlogger and Into Film journalist, Ceyda Uzun, on her first press interview junket: an interview with the writer of Swallows And Amazons, Andrea Gibb. Poet Don Paterson continues his series on great speeches in movie history with Rutger Hauer's philosophical monologue in Blade Runner. "Like tears in the rain". As thriller 'The Shallows' continues to do well at the US Box office, director James Watkins discusses how the point of view of the camera is crucial to dramatic suspense.

Ingrid Bergman and Don Paterson  

With Antonia Quirke. Award-winning poet Don Paterson continues his series about great speeches in cinema history with the ever quotable Casablanca. Don't forget - we'll always have Paris. Stig Bjorkman, the director of a new documentary about the star of Casablanca, Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words, talks about the controversy that dogged her career. While literary salons are all the rage, the cinematic equivalent is relatively rare. Antonia visits a monthly meeting of the Moving Image Makers Collective in Selkirk on the Scottish Borders, where short films are shown and critiqued. Will it end in tears? The Film Programme are looking for the unsung heroes of British cinema. Janet Rogers nominates her dad, the cinematographer Ted Lloyd, who worked with Hitchock on The 39 Steps. And Janet explains how she ended up starring a few adverts.

Alex Cox on Sid & Nancy, Don Paterson on Marlon Brando  

With Antonia Quirke. To mark its 30th anniversary release, the director of Sid & Nancy, Alex Cox reveals his regrets about his Sid Vicious bio-pic. And why he almost cast Daniel Day-Lewis as the punk icon. In a new series, award winning poet Don Paterson talks us through some of the great speeches in cinema history, beginning with one of the most quoted of all time - Marlon Brando declaring he coulda been a contender in On The Waterfront. Don also reveals the secrets of "lecturer's stress". Antonia discovers a cinema in the depths of the Mexican jungle, where plants grow through the floor and guests turn up in their pyjamas to enjoy a slap-up meal with their movies. Do you have an unsung hero of British cinema in your family ? If so, The Film Programme want to hear from you. This week, Robin Hayter nominates his dad, the actor James Hayter, who notched up over one hundred screen credits, from Blood On Satan's Claw to Pickwick Papers.

How to Direct a Thriller by Paul Greengrass  

With Francine Stock. Jason Bourne director Paul Greengrass gives Francine a personal masterclass on how to make a contemporary thriller and reveals the reasons why he would never want to direct a James Bond movie.

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