The Film Programme

The Film Programme

United Kingdom

The latest releases, the hottest stars and the leading directors, plus news and insights from the film world

Episodes

La La Land  

With Francine Stock Francine takes a trip to La La Land, the musical which has just swept the board at the Golden Gobes, with critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey. Another awards contender Manchester By The Sea is released this week, and Francine talks to its writer/director Kenneth Lonergan, who explains why he thinks Hollywood scripts are getting worse and have to explain everything to audiences "as if they're idiots". Comedian Lucy Porter discusses her love for Colleen Moore, the highest paid actress in Hollywood in 1927, whose lasting legacy is a fourteen foot dolls house she carefully designed, which is now preserved in a museum.

Jodorowsky  

With Francine Stock. Francine meets Alejandro Jodorowsky, the cult director, mime artist and graphic artist, who was discovered by John Lennon and who once attempted to make a version of Dune in which Salvador Dali was paid one million dollars a minute to play a hyper-realistic robot. Animator Jason Stalman takes us behind the scenes of The Corpse Bride and Fantastic Mr Fox and reveals why he sometimes wants to strangle the puppets he works with. As the awards seasons begins in earnest with The Golden Globes on Sunday, industry experts Clare Binns, Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh run the rule over the front-runners.

Silence  

Francine Stock talks to Andrew Garfield, the star of Martin Scorsese's Silence.

2016 in Pictures  

Francine Stock and guests discuss the best films of 2016.

Rogue One  

Francine Stock talks to Gareth Edwards, the director of the first Star Wars spin-off, Rogue One, who reveals what makes his film so different from the seven other episodes in the franchise. Adam Rutherford tries to explain how Rogue One fits into the ever-expanding Star Wars universe and why some works have been deemed "non-canonical". Few directors can be genuinely described as unique. Rama Burshtein has that honour, being the first and only female film-maker who is part of the Orthodox Jewish community. Her latest work, Through The Wall, is a rom-com about an Israeli woman who arranges her own wedding, despite the fact that she has no groom, in the belief that God will provide.

Paul Robeson  

With Francine Stock. Francine visits the setting and locations of The Proud Valley starring Paul Robeson, actor, activist, singer, linguist, lawyer and honorary Welshman. Historian Phil Carradice explains why Robeson became a folk hero in the Rhondda Valley and about the miners' campaign to get his passport returned when he was blacklisted by the United States government and banned from leaving the country. The Proud Valley is being shown across South Wales and is the opening film at The Phoenix in Ton Pentre, a community cinema that closed its doors last year. There, Francine meets volunteer projectionist Mike Chapman, who has traced the history of the venue to its early days when it was a music hall, starring such turns as Ned Edwards and "His Two Little Queenies, the smallest artistes on the variety stage" as they were billed. Otto Bell, the director of The Eagle Huntress reveals why he spent his life savings to make a documentary about a 13 year old Mongolian girl who tried to become the first female eagle hunter in 12 generations of her Kazakh family. The director of Life, Animated, Roger Ross Williams, takes us behind the scenes of his documentary about an American family who used the language of Disney animations to communicate with their son, who was diagnosed with regressive autism at the age of three.

Blue Velvet  

Francine Stock revisits the manicured lawns and gothic horror of Blue Velvet as David Lynch's surreal masterpiece celebrates its thirtieth anniversary. She is accompanied on her journey to the heart of suburban darkness by critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey.

A Tale of Two Picture Houses  

Francine Stock visits Campbeltown on the west coast of Scotland where the community have come together to save their art deco cinema, The Picture House, one of the most architecturally important in Europe, from terminal decline. The Uckfield Picture House celebrates its centenary this month and for over fifty years it's been owned by one family. Kevin Markwick has been with the cinema since he was babe in arms and talks about his life in pictures.

James Schamus  

Producer, writer, professor and former studio boss James Schamus tells Francine Stock why he took the plunge and directed his first film, Inidgnation, after three decades in the business. In an exclusive interview, award-winning writer/director Carol Morley reveals what her next project will be, even before a word is written or a scene is filmed.

Napoleon and I  

Historian Kevin Brownlow tells Francine Stock about his 50 year quest to restore Abel Gance's silent masterpiece Napoleon to its five and half hour glory, and why the search for missing scenes still continues even though the film is about to be released on DVD for the very first time. Composer Carl Davis takes us through his score, which borrows freely from the work of Beethoven, who dedicated his 3rd Symphony to Napoleon, only to regret it later.

Tom Ford  

With Francine Stock Fashion designer and movie director Tom Ford discusses his film-within-a-film Nocturnal Animals, and explains why he doesn't like to mix his two professions. As The Light Between Oceans has audiences weeping in the aisles, director Derek Cianfrance talks tear-jerkers and tragedy. Critics Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey reveal the films that have made them blub like babies.

Jacqueline Bisset  

With Francine Stock. Jacqueline Bisset looks back at Day For Night, Francois Truffaut's Oscar-winning movie about movie-making. She reveals why she refuses "to whinge" about the roles offered to older women. Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh enter the strange world of the film within a film, from Singin' In The Rain to Hail Caesar. FanGirl Quest, aka Tiia Ohman and Satu Walden, explain why they have travelled the globe from their native Finland to seek out famous locations and practice something they call "scene framing".

David Oyelowo  

With Francine Stock. Actor and producer David Oyelowo outlines his plans to revolutionize the British film industry and to make films that are genuinely diverse and reflective of the United Kingdom. Oyelowo argues that industry orthodoxies about what audiences want are "lies". And he explains why his son assumed that he would be playing the best friend, and not the male lead, in his new film The Queen Of Katwe. Francine visits Mouth That Roars, an organisation based in Hackney which trains teenagers in film production, many of whom are from communities that are under-represented in British Cinema. Denise Rose explains how her company is trying to redress the balance. The result of the BFI poll to find the best loved performance by a black star is announced exclusively on the programme.

Andrea Arnold  

With Francine Stock. British director Andrea Arnold discusses her own trip across the United States that inspired her road movie American Honey, and reveals how she discovered her star, Sasha Lane, on a beach in Miami. Critics Tim Robey and Larushka Ivan-Zadeh get their motors running and head out on the highway as they chart the progress of the American road movie. Producer Rebecca O'Brien discusses her collaboration with Ken Loach that has spanned a quarter of a century and is marked by a new, typically hard-hitting and award-winning drama I, Daniel Blake.

Black Star  

With Francine Stock. The Film Programme has teamed up with the BFI on a poll to decide the best performance by a black actor of all time. Among the nominees is Earl Cameron in Pool Of London, the first British movie to star a Caribbean actor. Francine hears from Earl about a career that has spanned over six decades and includes a Bond pic. Neil Brand reveals how modern technology helps him score a silent version of Robin Hood from 1922. Four translators discuss the subtle art of sub-titling.

Tim Burton  

Francine Stock enters Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children with Tim Burton. The director reveals why he loves Blackpool so much and why its pleasure beach reflects his state of mind. Director Babak Anvari reveals how much his horror movie, Under The Shadow, set in the Iran-Iraq war, is autobiographical. The director of When Marnie Was There discusses the popularity of British children's literature in Japan. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey takes us through the history of peculiar children in cinema.

David Arnold  

With Francine Stock A soundtrack special with David Arnold's notes on Independence Day, which has more saluting than any other movie, according to the composer. Adrian Utley of Portishead and Will Gregory of Goldfrapp discuss their new score for Carl Dreyer's silent masterpiece The Passion Of Joan Of Arc. Neil Brand reveals how John Williams put the magic into Harry Potter.

Colin Firth, Ralph Fiennes  

Colin Firth and Francine Stock indulge in some Bridget Jones's Baby talk, and the actor admits that he is partly to blame for the out-dated stereotype of the reticent Englishman. Ralph Fiennes explains why he spent two months learning Russian for his role in Two Women. Francine follows the continuing adventures of Alastair Till and Suzie Sinclair who left the Big Smoke for the sea air of Cornwall, and built their own cinema, without any previous knowledge of the film business. The Newlyn Filmhouse has been open for six months, so is it still a dream factory or waking nightmare ?

Kubo And The Two Strings, Hell Or High Water  

With Francine Stock. The spirit of Ray Harryhausen is invoked in a new stop-motion animation Kubo And The Two Strings, which boasts the largest stop-motion puppet in animation history, standing 16 feet tall. The director Travis Knight explains why the film took five years to make. Scottish director David Mackenzie reveals how he came to make an all-American crime thriller set deep in the heart of Texas, Hell Or High Water. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey follow the trail of the film's antecedents. Screenwriter Paul Mayersberg explains why the film studio pulled out of The Man Who Fell To Earth when they discovered David Bowie wasn't going to sing on the soundtrack.

Kubo And The Two Strings; Hell Or High Water  

Kubo And The Two Strings; Hell Or High Water With Francine Stock. The spirit of Ray Harryhausen is invoked in a new stop-motion animation Kubo And The Two Strings, which boasts the largest stop-motion puppet in animation history, standing 16 feet tall. The director Travis Knight explains why the film took five years to make. Scottish director David Mackenzie reveals how he came to make an all-American crime thriller set deep in the heart of Texas, Hell Or High Water. Larushka Ivan-Zadeh and Tim Robey follow the trail of the film's antecedents. Screenwriter Paul Mayersberg explains why the film studio pulled out of The Man Who Fell To Earth when they discovered David Bowie wasn't going to sing on the soundtrack.

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