Episodes

  • How can you help your children to identify fake news on the internet? With the explosion of different platforms it can be hard to keep tabs on what they are watching. Jane finds out from the editor of 'The Week Junior', Anna Bassi, and Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck, the founder of 'Lie Detectors', an award-winning news literacy project which empowers schoolchildren to identify propaganda and distorted facts online.

    Matt Hancock announced on 30 July that we should move towards more ‘zoom medicine’, but how does this impact women and women’s health issues? We speak to Dr Clare Gerada who advocates for a mixed approach - she believes patients should always be given the choice between a face to face or online appointment

    Over the next two weeks we are talking to women about their scars. They all talk about physical and emotional pain, and the business of having to deal with other people’s reactions on a day-to-day basis. And they speak of coming to terms with the skin they are in. Ena Miller went to meet 49 year old Jayne in Shropshire and heard her story.

    Journalist Emma John is also a classical trained musician who’d fallen out of love with her violin. A chance trip to the American south introduces her to bluegrass music. It feels like a homecoming. Emma gives up her job and undertakes a musical quest into the Appalachian mountains. The result a book: Wayfaring Stranger: A musical Journey in the American South. Emma talks to Jane about the breakthroughs and difficulties of her musical journey

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Kirsty Starkey

    Interviewed Guest: Dr Clare Gerada
    Interviewed Guest: Anna Bassi
    Interviewed Guest: Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck
    Interviewed Guest: Jayne
    Reporter: Ena Miller
    Interviewed Guest: Emma John

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  • Listen to sisters Ella and Amy. They're behind Kids Against Plastic and talk to us about the world's reliance on plastic, especially single use plastic, and the way we just dump it. On Wednesday they're part of the online climate change forum called ‘Race Against Climate Change’.

    We go to Ireland to hear about a tampon TV ad which has caused a stir, so much so it's been taken off air. Some people have been offended by it due to its straightforward description of how you use them. Two Irish women defend the ad. They're Alexandra Ryan and Ciara Kelly.

    After Ireland we go to India to learn about a petition which urges the Indian Prime Minister to encourage men to do their fair share of housework. So far the petition has 70,000 signatures.

    And we go to the jazz and soul singer, Zara McFarlane who talks about her album Songs of An Unknown Tongue. She says that her latest single called Black Treasure is a "declaration, proclamation and celebration of black Britishness and womanhood."

  • We discuss the process of recovery after domestic abuse, the way that these relationships can stay with you but also how you can build a new life after. How do those who have survived abuse find their behaviour affected? What do they wish that their friends and family had understood? And how can friends and family can help? With Sue Penna, co-founder of Rockpool who deliver trauma-informed training programmes for those working with survivors of abuse, and Jennifer Gilmour, an author and advocate for women in abusive relationships, and founder of #AbuseTalk on twitter and the Abuse Talk podcast.

    The school summer holidays are underway across the UK – but this year they’re going to be a bit different. Thanks to coronavirus there’s a shortage of childcare and holiday clubs, helpful grandparents are mostly off-limits, parents are already exhausted from juggling home-working and home-school for four months, and teenagers are faced with another six weeks of restricted freedoms. So how are people planning to make it through to September? Joeli Brearley is the founder of Pregnant then Screwed, and Leann Cross is the director of Home Start Greenwich.

    Now that cycling may soon be on prescription and bikes are soaring in popularity due to the pandemic, how can women ensure they have a pain-free ride? Endurance cyclist and coach Jasmijn Muller talks about what she’s learned from years of serious pain, and specialist women’s cycling physio Bianca Broadbent gives her top troubleshooting tips for everything from saddles to lubricating cream, and not wearing pants.

    We explore what it’s like to be a black woman and work in the music industry. Jacqueline Springer is a music lecturer and journalist. Fleur East is an artist and songwriter who rose to fame after coming second on the X Factor in 2014. Lioness MC is a Grime rapper who has been making songs for over 10 years.

    In her book Sex Robots and Vegan Meat, journalist Jenny Kleeman explores seismic changes in four core areas of human experience: birth, food, sex and death. We hear about the implications of fully functioning artificial wombs and what sex robots mean for future relationships between men and women.

    In the next of our summer series of How to guides, we discuss how to end your relationship well. It seems lockdown has accelerated the process for some couples, with one UK-wide legal services firm reporting a 42% increase in enquiries about divorce between March and May. We offer you expert suggestions on managing the practical, emotional, legal and financial aspects of splitting up, with the least damage to you and others. Jenni is joined by family lawyer and mediator Rebekah Gershuny, FT Money digital editor Lucy Warwick-Ching, family therapist Joanne Hipplewith and founder of amicable Kate Daly.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rosie Stopher

  • New Department for Education figures out this morning revealed that 7,894 children were excluded from school in England during 2018/19. This is a slight decrease from the previous year, but otherwise the numbers have been increasing year on year since 2013. Although girls are less likely than boys to be formally excluded, a charity called Social Finance UK released research this month showing that girls are removed from school in such a way that they're often missed from official statistics - something the charity call 'the invisibly excluded'. But what effect does being expelled have on young people? And how are the ripples of exclusion felt by the teachers and parents of the children involved?

    Ultrarunner Beth Pascall has just completed one of the most gruelling Lake District fell challenges and set the fastest-known time for a woman: 65 miles in 14 hours 34 minutes - taking 50 minutes off the previous best. How did she go from her first cross-country run at six years old to a speciality distance of 100 miles? And how does she balance being a paediatrician with an inevitably demanding training regime? Jenni is also joined by Dr Nicola Rawlinson, a performance physiologist at Loughborough Sport who's researching female physiology and sports performance for her PhD. She discusses why women perform so well at ultra distances and how our bodies adapt to exercise.

    We discuss the process of recovery after domestic abuse, the way that these relationships can stay with you but also how you can build a new life after. How do those who have survived abuse find their behaviour affected? What do they wish that their friends and family had understood? And how can friends and family can help? With Sue Penna, co-founder of Rockpool who deliver trauma-informed training programmes for those working with survivors of abuse. Sue designed the Recovery Tool Kit programme, delivered to survivors of abuse across the UK, she’s also the author of The Recovery Tool Kit: A 12 week plan to support your journey from Domestic Abuse. And Jennifer Gilmour, an author and advocate for women in abusive relationships, and founder of #AbuseTalk on twitter (live every Wednesday) and the Abuse Talk podcast.

  • The Black Lives Matter movement has shone a light on a number of areas of society where discrimination and prejudice exists beneath the surface. Today we explore what it’s like to be a black woman and work in the music industry. Jacqueline Springer is a music lecturer and journalist. Fleur East is an artist and songwriter who rose to fame after coming second on the X Factor in 2014. Lioness MC is a Grime rapper who has been making songs for over 10 years.

    PMDD, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, an extreme form of premenstrual syndrome or PMS. affects up to one million women in the UK but is little known, and often misdiagnosed. The BBC has carried out its own research and heard the experiences of 4000 women across the UK. Nearly 3,000 said they’d had suicidal thoughts and around 1,500 self-harmed in the days before their period. To discuss diagnosis and treatment options we hear from Laura Murphy, Director of Education and Awareness for IAPMD (The International Association for Premenstrual Disorders) and Founder of Vicious Cycle : Making PMDD visible, and from Dr Paula Briggs, Consultant in Sexual and Reproductive Health at Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Beverley Purcell

  • We often take it for granted that cycling can make you feel a bit saddle sore. But that expectation masks the fact that many women experience real pain when cycling - due to a combination of inappropriate saddles, ill-fitting bikes and a lack of understanding by medical experts of the damage that can be done to the vulva. Now that cycling may soon be on prescription and bikes are soaring in popularity due to the pandemic, how can women ensure they have a pain-free ride? Endurance cyclist and coach Jasmijn Muller talks about what she’s learned from years of serious pain, and specialist women’s cycling physio Bianca Broadbent gives her top troubleshooting tips for everything from saddles to lubricating cream, and not wearing pants.

    The Chartered Counselling Psychologist and former Great British Bake Off Finalist, Kimberley Wilson, joins Jane to discuss her time working in a women’s prison, her mission to improve brain health with simple lifestyle and nutritional tips, while still enjoying an occasional slice of cake.

    Writer and performer Jackie Clune joins Jane to talk about her new novel I’m Just a Teenage Punchbag, a comic tale of menopause, grief and a disillusionment with motherhood.

  • The school summer holidays are underway across the UK – but this year they’re going to be a bit different. Thanks to coronavirus there’s a shortage of childcare and holiday clubs, helpful grandparents are mostly off-limits, parents are already exhausted from juggling home-working and home-school for four months, and teenagers are faced with another six weeks of restricted freedoms. So how are people planning to make it through to September?
    In her book Sex Robots and Vegan Meat, journalist Jenny Kleeman explores seismic changes in four core areas of human experience: birth, food, sex and death. Jane will be talking to Jenny about the implications of fully functioning artificial wombs, what sex robots mean for future relationships between men and women, who the people are shaping the technological changes taking place and how soon these inventions will become an inevitable part of human life.
    Summerland is a new film set during WW2, featuring Alice a folklore investigator debunking myths using science to disprove the existence of magic. She lives a solitary life in a seaside cottage in Sussex but her way of life is turned upside when she has reluctantly to take in a young evacuee .
    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Interviewed guest: Leann Cross Director, Home Start Greenwich
    Interviewed guest: Emma Thomas, CEO of Young Minds
    Interviewed guest: Jenny Kleeman
    Interviewed guest: Jessica Swale, film director
    Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

  • Known as The Barnsley Nightingale, the folk singer, Kate Rusby talks about her latest album of covers, and recording it with her husband and two young daughters.

    A number of high street retail stores have announced job losses. So many of the shop floor, customer facing jobs are done by women. Retail analyst Catherine Shuttleworth, and Sue Prynn,deputy divisional officer for USDAW's southern division discuss the consequences of these lay-offs.

    In court in New York last week President Trump’s niece, Mary J Trump found out that a temporary restraining order on her book about her uncle was going to be lifted. She spoke about Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created The World’s Most Dangerous Man.

    In the next of our summer series of practical How to guides, how to be a good friend. The broadcaster and beauty expert Sali Hughes, the comedian Jenni Eclair whose new book is Older and Wider – A Survivor’s Guide to the Menopause and Radhika Sanghani, a freelance journalist and novelist discuss.

    The Australian chef, Lara Lee specialises in Indonesian cooking. She cooks the perfect sambal, which is a hot relish found on every Indonesian dinner table.

    Emma Gannon is a podcaster and writer. She’s now written her first novel. In ”Olive”- the central character is thirty three and, like her creator is childfree by choice.

    The gymnast Simone Biles is on the cover of American Vogue’s August 2020 issue, but critics have said the photoshoot highlights why there needs to be more diversity in the photography industry. The photographer Ola Adegoroye and Lazara Storm, who works as a commercial model and is now moving behind the scenes discuss.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • In court in New York last week President Trump’s niece, Mary J Trump found out that a temporary restraining order on her book about her uncle was going to be lifted. She joins Jenni to talk about Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created The World’s Most Dangerous Man.

    Editor-in-chief of ELLE magazine and board member of the Social Mobility Commission, Farrah Storr, chats to Jenni about launching their first ever mentoring scheme to find the next generation of creatives. The September issue of the magazine is traditionally the big fashion issue. However, this year the magazine is shifting focus to what’s next and how to rebuild the fashion industry after the pandemic.

    For many households, Tiktok has been a go-to for distraction and entertainment during coronavirus. The video-sharing app has around 800 million active users around the world, but this week, the app is back in the news over concerns over links to the Chinese government regime. We speak to BBC World Service reporter and Tiktok user Sophia Smith-Galer, and journalist and mother of Tiktok users, Zoe Williams about what the app offers and how concerned parents should be.

    The novelist Josephine Cox has died at the age of 82. She wrote more than 60 books and sold over 20 million copies- Her works include Two Sisters, The Beachcomber and Her Father's Sins. She grew up in poverty in a cotton mill house in Blackburn in the 40s and 50s. She was one of 10 children, sleeping six to a bed. She spoke to Jenni in 2001 about the novel the Woman Who Left – based on her own experiences growing up in Blackburn.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Mary J Trump
    Interviewed guest: Farrah Storr
    Interviewed guest: Anya
    Interviewed guest: Maria
    Interviewed guest: Sophia Smith Galer
    Interviewed guest: Zoe Williams
    Interviewed guest: Josephine Cox

  • The folk singer, Kate Rusby also has the nickname, The Barnsley Nightingale. Kate's latest album is covers of pop music you're bound to recognise, but in her own folksy, mellow way. She talks to us about why she did an album of covers, how she recorded it with her husband and girls, and why Susannah Hoff made her cry.

    Seoul in South Korea is known as the plastic surgery capital of the world. There were a million cosmetic procedures last year. Frances Cha, a former travel and culture editor, speaks to Jenni about her new novel ‘If I Had Your Face’ and how she researched it by visiting plastic surgeons and escort bars.

    We talk to the union, Community, about textile factories in Leicester and the recent concerns over low pay and the lack of social distancing in some of them.

    And we Cook The Perfect. Today it's with the Australian chef, Lara Lee. She specialises in Indonesian cooking, due to her family background. She shares recipes that have been passed down the generations. Today, she's cooking the perfect sambal, which is a hot relish found on every Indonesian dinner table.

  • Heading to the British coast on holiday this year? The fascinating Heather Buttivant tells us what wonders we can find in the common rock pool, and how to interest kids in them.

  • In the next of our summer series of practical How to guides, we talk about how to be a good friend. There will be tips on how to make, keep and politely shed friends at different stages in your life. We’ll discuss the tools you need to navigate tricky things like being over or underwhelmed by contact with your friends, and what to do if you don’t like your mate’s partner. Jane is joined by the broadcaster and beauty expert Sali Hughes, the comedian Jenni Eclair whose new book is Older and Wider – A Survivor’s Guide to the Menopause and Radhika Sanghani, a freelance journalist and novelist.

    A self-employed hairdresser has won the right to claim for notice, holiday and redundancy pay in a case that could affect other workers. An employment tribunal agreed that Meghan Gorman, should be entitled to the benefits of an employee at the salon where she had worked on a self-employed basis. We hear from Meghan and Beth Hale, a Partner specialising in Employment and Partnership law at CM Murray.

    The environmentalist and educator Heather Buttivant on what wonders you can find in the rockpools of the British coastline, and how to interest children in them. Her new book is called Rock Pool: Extraordinary Encounters Between the Tides : A Life -Long Fascination told in Twenty-Four Creatures

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • As the neutral pronouns they/them start to enter the public consciousness, so too has the idea of gender-neutral parenting. Sarah Davies is a new mum to baby Quinn and talks about her experience of practicing gender-neutrality in a highly gendered society. Prof Melissa Hines from the University of Cambridge and Dr Brenda Scott from City University have both studied how children’s gender identity and behaviour develops over time – and are helping to separate what’s innate about our gender expression and what can be influenced by what our parents teach us.

    Marks & Spencer has said 950 jobs are at risk as part of plans to reduce store management and head office roles. It was already undergoing a transformation that included cutting costs and closing some stores. Job losses have already been announced at John Lewis, Boots and Debenhams. Jobs at Oasis and Warehouse went in April. So many of these shop-floor, customer-facing jobs are done by women. We explore the consequences of these lay-offs with retail analyst Catherine Shuttleworth and Sue Prynn, deputy divisional officer for USDAW's southern division.

    Emma Donoghue, the author of the international bestseller Room, has set her latest novel The Pull of the Stars in Dublin in a maternity ward in 1918 at the height of the Great Flu. She explores the lives of a nurse, a volunteer and a doctor on the run, over the course of three days. She tells Jane why she’s mixed fictional with real characters.

    When Anna Wilson’s father, the man who has calmed her mother for over 40 years, becomes ill with cancer, things become extremely difficult. Her mother has always been ‘a little eccentric’ but in her seventies she becomes increasingly anxious and manic. Anna joins Jane to discuss her memoir, A Place for Everything, in which she talks about the difficulties of getting proper help for her mother, her mother’s late diagnosis of autism at the age of 72, her father’s illness and death and what it was like to care for her parents in their final years.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • Michaela Coel’s BBC drama ‘I May Destroy You’ has brought to light a number of interesting dilemmas, particularly within the realm of female friendships. Today we ask – is it okay to leave a friend on a night out? If a friend is too drunk or too disorderly to take care of themselves, but refuses to leave the venue or get in a cab, what can and should you do? Harriet Marsden is a freelance journalist. Toni Tone is a public speaker and podcast presenter.

    A new report by the SistersNotStrangers coalition, a group of 8 women’s organisations across the country, reveals the hardships experienced by asylum-seeking women in England and Wales during the pandemic. They say women have been homeless and hungry during the pandemic and are calling for ‘far-reaching’ reforms of the asylum process. Jane hears from Loraine Mponela who has sought asylum and Natasha Walter, Director of Women for Refugee Women and one of organisations behind the report.

    Emma Gannon’s heroine Olive is thirty three and childfree by choice. She has a dream job, close friends and her life might seem Instagram-perfect. But, things are complicated. Her relationships and friendships are changing and other people’s expectations are hemming her in. Adult life is not turning out as she thought it would and Olive needs to take stock. Writer, podcaster and now novelist Emma Gannon joins Jane.

    The gymnast Simone Biles is on the cover of Vogue’s August 2020 issue, but critics have said the photoshoot highlights why there needs to be more diversity in the photography industry. Jane discusses the issues of photographing black women, both in front of and behind the camera, with the photographer Ola Adegoroye and Lazara Storm, who works as a commercial model and is now moving behind the scenes.

    Presented by Jane Garvey
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Loraine Mponela
    Interviewed guest: Natasha Walter
    Interviewed guest: Emma Gannon
    Interviewed guest: Ola Adegoroye
    Interviewed guest: Lazara Storm
    Interviewed guest: Harriet Marsden
    Interviewed guest: Toni Tone

  • Karen Gibson aka “Godmother of Gospel” who shot to worldwide fame in 2018 after she appeared conducting The Kingdom Choir at the Royal Wedding of Harry and Meghan – tells me about the Choir’s new single Real Love.

    We hear from the writer Caitlin Moran about her new film based on her memoir How To Build A Girl.

    We discuss why Black people are more likely to end up in the mental health system and be sectioned with Sophie Corlett of the charity Mind, the producer Tobi Kyeremateng, the psychotherapist Dawn Estefan and the co-director of Listen Up Research Jahnine Davis.

    Housing benefit discrimination has been judged unlawful and in breach of the Equality Act. Research done by the charity Shelter shows that ‘No DSS’ policies put women and disabled people at a particular disadvantage, because they are more likely to receive housing benefit. We hear from Shelter’s solicitor Rose Arnall, and its chief executive Polly Neate.

    As British Gymnastics, the UK Governing Body for the sport of gymnastics announces an independent review following concerns raised by several British athletes about a culture of mistreatment and abuse, Sarah whose four daughters trained locally in gymnastics and experienced varying degrees of abuse and Nicole Pavier, a retired member of the senior England gymnastic squad, share their stories.

    And Prof Dilys Williams the Founder and Director of CSF (Centre for Sustainable Fashion and Aja Barber a personal stylist and style consultant whose work focuses on sustainability and ethics, discuss the real price of fast fashion?

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed
    Editor: Louise Corley

    Interviewed Guest: Dawn Estefan
    Interviewed Guest: Toby Kyeremateng
    Interviewed Guest: Janine Davis
    Interviewed Guest: Sophie Corlett
    Interviewed Guest: Rose Arnall
    Interviewed Guest: Polly Neate
    Interviewed Guest: Karen Gibson
    Interviewed Guest: Nicole Pavier
    Interviewed Guest: AJa Barber
    Interviewed Guest: Professor Dilys Williams
    Interviewed Guest: Caitlin Moran

  • How To Build A Girl – based on Caitlin Moran’s non-fiction memoir of the same name - has now been turned into a film It introduces us to Johanna Morrigan, a young Wolverhampton local who’s struggling to get to grips with the “incredible unfolding” that comes with puberty. The screenplay is written by the woman herself and was filmed in and around the City. She joins Jenni to talk about what it means to see her story on screen.

    Do you want to change your life for the better? This summer Woman’s Hour will be helping you work out how. How to change career, how to be a better friend, how to end your relationship well and how to make time for yourself, guilt-free. We’ll bring together women with expertise and experience to guide you through some of those tricky turning points and blocked paths. Listen out for the How To series over the next few weeks..

    Today the key things you need to do to achieve both the immediate or the long term career change - identifying your transferable skills, working out the financial implications; weighing up the pro’s and con’s, polishing up your online presence – and taking the leap.

    Plus why England's School Fruit and Veg scheme will be back in September, thanks to mum turned campaigner Hannah Cameron McKenna . We'll hear about why she got involved in the campaign and from Zoe Griffiths a registered nutritionist about why eating more fruit and veg as a child is so important.


    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell

    Guest; Caitlin Moran
    Guest; Sarah Ellis
    Guest; Samantha Clarke
    Guest; Lucy Kellaway
    Guest; Hannah Cameron McKenna
    Guest; Zoe Griffiths

  • The mental health charity, Mind is calling for the government to publish their White Paper on the Mental Health Act. They have been pushing for reforms so that fewer black people who are disproportionately represented, are sectioned and those that are sectioned treated with more dignity. So why is it that despite being among the top demographics to be diagnosed and four times more likely to be sectioned, the therapeutic space isn’t tailored towards black communities, and black women and girls in particular are left hanging in the balance? Jenni is joined by Sophie Corlett of Mind, producer Tobi Kyeremateng, the psychotherapist Dawn Estefan and Jahnine Davis a PhD researcher and Co-founder of Listen Up Research Company.

    The size of women’s pension pots appears to have fallen three times as much as men’s during the Coronavirus pandemic according to Profile Pensions, an impartial pensions advisor. Why is this and what can women do to ensure they have enough to live on when they retire? Jenni speaks to Baroness Ros Altmann, former Pensions Minister and to Romi Savova, Founder and Chief Executive of PensionBee.

    Natasha Gregson Wagner is the daughter of the American actress Natalie Wood, who began her career in film as a child actor and successfully transitioned to young adult roles. She was the recipient of four Golden Globes, and received three Academy Award nominations, and is best remembered for films including Splendour in the Grass, West Side Story and Gypsy. Natalie died suddenly by drowning off Catalina Island at the age of 43. Natasha has now produced a documentary and written the memoir More Than Love, An Intimate Portrait of My Mother, in which she describes their relationship and coming to terms with her grief, amid rumours and tabloid speculation surrounding her mother’s death.

    And a new report by The Howard League for Penal Reform is calling for major changes in the way that the courts make decisions about remanding women to prison in England and Wales. This is an area of the criminal justice system that they say has been overlooked. Jenni is joined by Dr Miranda Bevan, policy associate at the Howard League for Penal Reform and Val Castell, Chair of the Magistrates Association’s Adult Court Committee.

  • Karen Gibson aka 'Godmother of Gospel' shot to worldwide fame in 2018 after she appeared conducting The Kingdom Choir at the Royal Wedding of Harry and Meghan. She joins Jenni to talk about the choir's new single, her passion for gospel music and her recent experience on Celebrity Masterchef.

    British Gymnastics, the UK governing body for the sport of gymnastics, has announced that there will be an independent review following concerns raised by several British athletes about a culture of mistreatment and abuse. These allegations follow similar conversations that are happening in America because of a new Netflix documentary exploring the Larry Nassar scandal. So what fuels a culture of neglect? And what are people within the gymnastic community hoping will happen now? Jenni discusses with a woman called 'Sarah' who has four daughters, all of whom trained in gymnastics and experienced varying degrees of abuse, and Nicole Pavier, a retired member of the senior England gymnastic squad.

    A pair of glamorous strangers, a bunch of adolescent siblings and some distracted adults sharing a beach for one long hot summer. Sounds like the perfect recipe for sexual intrigue and disaster. Award-winning author Meg Rosoff joins Jenni to discuss her new novel The Great Godden.

    In her new book X+Y, A mathematician's manifesto for rethinking gender, Dr Eugenia Cheng – who has spent many years in the male-dominated field of mathematics – draws on insights from her own subject and personal experience to radically reframe the whole discussion around gender.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Jenni Murray