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  • Alexandra Wilson on her new book “In Black and White”. The story of breaking down barriers of race and class to become a barrister. She explains how losing a very close family friend to knife crime made her pursue a career in law and how she has overcome her family’s fears of becoming “part of the system”

    Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee for President in this year’s US elections has finally named his running mate as Kamala Harris. Senator for California, she was Biden’s former rival for the Democratic nomination and will be the first woman of colour to be nominated for national office by a major political party. Kelly Dittmar, Director of Research at the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, and Kimberly Peeler-Allen, co-founder of Higher Heights, an organisation supporting Black women into elected office, discuss the impact and reaction to her appointment.

    Plus we hear all about latest female technology firms - also know as Femtechs. Offering everything from period tracking apps to cooling menopausal bracelets - can they help women have more control over their bodies and their health?

    And the female authors looking to reclaim their name.

    Presenter Jenni Murray
    Producer Beverley Purcell
    Photo Credit; Laurie Lewis.

    Guest Alexandra Wilson
    Guest Berenice Magistretti
    Guest Billie Quinlan
    Guest Kimberly Peeler-allen
    Guest Kelly Dittmar

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson has called for Britain and France to work together to stop migrant boats crossing the Channel to Dover. On Friday a record number of unaccompanied migrant children arrived in the UK. The 23 youths were taken into the care of Kent County Council, on top of the 70 who arrived in July. According to the latest Home Office Statistics 90% of young (under 18) unaccompanied refugees who come in to the UK every year are male. What happens to the ten percent who are female? We hear from Dinah Beckett from Migration Yorkshire and Sharon Pearson who’s fostered Elsa.

    Yes God, Yes is a new film about 16 year old Alice growing up a Catholic and attending Catholic school in the early noughties in Midwest America During a chat on AOL she discovers masturbation and is overwhelmed with guilt. Seeking redemption, she attends a religious retreat to try and suppress her urges. Karen Maine, is the director..

    Part of our series about women and scars: we meet Laura who is 27 – she’s a care worker from Caerphilly in South Wales and she is a burns survivor.

    In 1920, a hundred years ago, the American Congress passed the 19th Amendment which gave women in the United States the right to vote. There had been an active and vociferous suffragette movement, led by some well known names – Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony. The name of Lucy Stone is less familiar. She wanted votes for all, regardless of sex or race. Moira Hickey went to her birthplace, West Brookfield, Massachusetts in 2018 to join the celebration of the bicentenary of Lucy Stone’s birth.


    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Reporter: Ena Miller
    Reporter: Moira Hickey
    Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

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  • Presented by Jenni Murray.

    Every few days we hear of more jobs going. The Bank of England said at the end of last week that unemployment is likely to hit 2.5 million this year. That means the jobless total would almost double by Christmas. Tonight there’s a Channel 4 documentary series starting which focuses on a job centre in Leeds and the people who use it. Jenni is joined by Olivia, who is a single mother mum and unemployed, Jan Baxter, who works at the jobcentre in Leeds and Helen Barnard, Acting Director of
    Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

    In Daisy Johnson’s novel Sisters July and September have an uncannily close relationship and one is more powerful than the other. Their mother struggles to cope and when things come to a head after a nasty incident at school they flee to a house in Yorkshire which turns out not to be the refuge they needed. Jenni talks to Daisy Johnson about horror, adolescence and the relationship between the two.

    The BBC Elite British Sportswomen's Survey was sent to 1,068 women in 39 different sports and received 543 responses. The survey covers trolling; funding and impact of Coronavirus; Periods and the Pill; Racism; Sexism; Abortion and Family Planning; Mental Health. Jenni discusses the findings with Becky Grey, BBC Sports reporter, Susannah Townsend, Gold medal hockey player, Priyanaz Chatterji, Scottish cricketer for Scottish Women’s Team and Tammy Parlour, CEO of Women Sport’s Trust.

    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Karen Dalziel

  • The multi award winning writer Zadie Smith on 'Intimations', a collection of personal essays about lockdown. Photo courtesy of Dominique Nabokov.

    The rise in families with children under 5 needing help from baby banks has risen significantly since the pandemic began. We hear from Lauren Elrick who has a fifteen month old daughter and uses Abernecessities in Aberdeenshire. Sophia Parker, chief executive of Little Village baby bank in London and Tracy Thorn, an NHS family nurse.

    A television tampon advert has been banned in Ireland for causing widespread offence. Alexandra Ryan, CEO of Goss Media, and the radio presenter and former doctor Ciara Kelly discuss.

    Victoria Cilliers’ story made headlines in 2015, when it emerged her husband had tried to kill her by tampering with her parachute. Against all odds, she survived. After two trials he was sentenced to 18 years on two counts of attempted murder. Now she's written a book called 'I Survived'.

    At the funeral service of John Hume, the Northern Irish politician and Nobel Prize winner, it was said that 'when the history of Ireland is written, if Pat Hume's name is not beside John's, it will be incomplete history'. Pat, his wife, had been at his side during the Troubles, during peace, and his years of living with dementia. Jenni hears from Eimear O'Callaghan, former BBC News Editor, and Monica McWilliams, Emeritus Professor at Ulster University.

    Teenage sisters, Ella and Amy Meek are the founders of Kids Against Plastic. This week they were speaking at online climate change forum, hosted by the all-electric Formula E race Team Envision Virgin Racing. They told us about their concerns about the rise in single plastic use, and how we can all be plastic clever.

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • Would you stand up for your mate if she was being discriminated against? Would you stick up for her, even if it caused you problems? Today we discuss how to be a good ally. Whether it’s racism, sexism or homophobia what’s the best way to speak up and support your friends? We're joined by Chloe Laws from Glamour Magazine, Richie Brave who presents Brave Conversations on BBC 1Xtra, and Danielle Dash who's a freelance writer.

    Victoria Cilliers’ story made headlines in 2015. We heard how her husband tried to kill her by tampering with her parachute. Against all odds, she survived. After two trials, and the world’s press scrutinising their relationship, he was sentenced to 18 years on two counts of attempted murder. Now she's written a book called 'I Survived'.

    We chat to two Black businesswomen about their successes and challenges. They share their advice about setting up your own business. They are Rose Adkins Hulse, Founder & CEO of ScreenHits TV and Shalom Lloyd, Founder & MD of Naturally Tribal.

  • Zadie Smith’s newest book, ‘Intimations’, was written during the early months of lockdown. It is a series of personal essays reflecting on the unprecedented situation of a worldwide pandemic, hoping to provoke readers to reflect on what has happened and what might come next.

    Maternity care is to be the first focus of an independent new panel set up by the Health and Social Care Committee to give ratings to pledges made by the government. Ros Bragg from Maternity Action talks about what she would expect to be looked at, and the Chair of the new panel, Dame Jane Dacre, Professor of Medical Edcation at University College London, explains how patients’ experience will form a part of this evaluation.

    In a new series we’re talking to women about their scars. They all talk about physical and emotional pain and the business of having to deal with other people’s reactions on a day to day basis and of coming to terms with the skin they are in. Today, Emily’s story.

    Xuefei Yang is one of the world’s leading classical guitarists. Born in China, she started playing guitar aged seven, less than a decade after the end of the cultural revolution at a time when guitars were not well known in the country. By aged 10 she had already given her first public appearance. She toured the world as a schoolgirl and has now performed in over 50 countries. Her latest album, Sketches of China, draws from over 2000 years of Chinese culture and music. Making it has been a long-held dream, requiring transposing traditional music for the guitar to increase the repertoire for her instrument. She talks to Jenni about the stories behind the album, the story of the kidnapped intellectual woman Wenji Cai during the Han Dynasty and why it’s important to her to celebrate Chinese culture now.

  • The Duchess of Cambridge has spearheaded a campaign to persuade retailers to donate items to baby banks around the UK. New figures from the three big charities – Baby Basics, Little Village and AberNecessities have published figures which show the number of families with children under five who’ve needed their help has risen significantly since the coronavirus crisis began. How are they managing to cope? We hear from Lauren Elrick who has a fifteen month old daughter and uses Abernecessities in Aberdeenshire. Sophia Parker, chief executive of Little Village Baby bank in London and Tracy Thorn, an NHS Family Nurse.

    For the first time in its 29-year history, female artists and female-fronted bands have outnumbered men on the shortlist for the Mercury Prize. Alongside Dua Lipa and Laura Marling, Georgia has been nominated for her second album ‘Seeking Thrills’. She joins Jenni to discuss her music, the transcendental power of the dancefloor, and being nominated for the Mercury Prize, 25 years after her father.

    This morning the funeral of John Hume, the Northern Irish politician and Nobel Prize winner will be held. He’s survived by his wife and professional partner, Pat. Who is the woman for whom the The John and Pat Hume Foundation for Peaceful Change and Reconciliation was formed? We hear from Eimear O'Callaghan, former BBC News Editor, and Monica McWilliams, Emeritus Professor at Ulster University.

    Luan Goldie has written a new novel called Homecoming. Set in London and Kenya over a period of twenty years, it is a story about love, family and friendship. Luan is a primary school teacher and her last book, Nightingale Point, was longlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2020 and she won the Costa Short Story Award in 2017.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • How can you help your children to identify fake news on the internet? With the explosion of different platforms it can be hard to keep tabs on what they are watching. Jane finds out from the editor of 'The Week Junior', Anna Bassi, and Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck, the founder of 'Lie Detectors', an award-winning news literacy project which empowers schoolchildren to identify propaganda and distorted facts online.

    Matt Hancock announced on 30 July that we should move towards more ‘zoom medicine’, but how does this impact women and women’s health issues? We speak to Dr Clare Gerada who advocates for a mixed approach - she believes patients should always be given the choice between a face to face or online appointment

    Over the next two weeks we are talking to women about their scars. They all talk about physical and emotional pain, and the business of having to deal with other people’s reactions on a day-to-day basis. And they speak of coming to terms with the skin they are in. Ena Miller went to meet 49 year old Jayne in Shropshire and heard her story.

    Journalist Emma John is also a classical trained musician who’d fallen out of love with her violin. A chance trip to the American south introduces her to bluegrass music. It feels like a homecoming. Emma gives up her job and undertakes a musical quest into the Appalachian mountains. The result a book: Wayfaring Stranger: A musical Journey in the American South. Emma talks to Jane about the breakthroughs and difficulties of her musical journey

    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Producer: Kirsty Starkey

    Interviewed Guest: Dr Clare Gerada
    Interviewed Guest: Anna Bassi
    Interviewed Guest: Juliane von Reppert-Bismarck
    Interviewed Guest: Jayne
    Reporter: Ena Miller
    Interviewed Guest: Emma John

  • Listen to sisters Ella and Amy. They're behind Kids Against Plastic and talk to us about the world's reliance on plastic, especially single use plastic, and the way we just dump it. On Wednesday they're part of the online climate change forum called ‘Race Against Climate Change’.

    We go to Ireland to hear about a tampon TV ad which has caused a stir, so much so it's been taken off air. Some people have been offended by it due to its straightforward description of how you use them. Two Irish women defend the ad. They're Alexandra Ryan and Ciara Kelly.

    After Ireland we go to India to learn about a petition which urges the Indian Prime Minister to encourage men to do their fair share of housework. So far the petition has 70,000 signatures.

    And we go to the jazz and soul singer, Zara McFarlane who talks about her album Songs of An Unknown Tongue. She says that her latest single called Black Treasure is a "declaration, proclamation and celebration of black Britishness and womanhood."

  • We discuss the process of recovery after domestic abuse, the way that these relationships can stay with you but also how you can build a new life after. How do those who have survived abuse find their behaviour affected? What do they wish that their friends and family had understood? And how can friends and family can help? With Sue Penna, co-founder of Rockpool who deliver trauma-informed training programmes for those working with survivors of abuse, and Jennifer Gilmour, an author and advocate for women in abusive relationships, and founder of #AbuseTalk on twitter and the Abuse Talk podcast.

    The school summer holidays are underway across the UK – but this year they’re going to be a bit different. Thanks to coronavirus there’s a shortage of childcare and holiday clubs, helpful grandparents are mostly off-limits, parents are already exhausted from juggling home-working and home-school for four months, and teenagers are faced with another six weeks of restricted freedoms. So how are people planning to make it through to September? Joeli Brearley is the founder of Pregnant then Screwed, and Leann Cross is the director of Home Start Greenwich.

    Now that cycling may soon be on prescription and bikes are soaring in popularity due to the pandemic, how can women ensure they have a pain-free ride? Endurance cyclist and coach Jasmijn Muller talks about what she’s learned from years of serious pain, and specialist women’s cycling physio Bianca Broadbent gives her top troubleshooting tips for everything from saddles to lubricating cream, and not wearing pants.

    We explore what it’s like to be a black woman and work in the music industry. Jacqueline Springer is a music lecturer and journalist. Fleur East is an artist and songwriter who rose to fame after coming second on the X Factor in 2014. Lioness MC is a Grime rapper who has been making songs for over 10 years.

    In her book Sex Robots and Vegan Meat, journalist Jenny Kleeman explores seismic changes in four core areas of human experience: birth, food, sex and death. We hear about the implications of fully functioning artificial wombs and what sex robots mean for future relationships between men and women.

    In the next of our summer series of How to guides, we discuss how to end your relationship well. It seems lockdown has accelerated the process for some couples, with one UK-wide legal services firm reporting a 42% increase in enquiries about divorce between March and May. We offer you expert suggestions on managing the practical, emotional, legal and financial aspects of splitting up, with the least damage to you and others. Jenni is joined by family lawyer and mediator Rebekah Gershuny, FT Money digital editor Lucy Warwick-Ching, family therapist Joanne Hipplewith and founder of amicable Kate Daly.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Rosie Stopher

  • New Department for Education figures out this morning revealed that 7,894 children were excluded from school in England during 2018/19. This is a slight decrease from the previous year, but otherwise the numbers have been increasing year on year since 2013. Although girls are less likely than boys to be formally excluded, a charity called Social Finance UK released research this month showing that girls are removed from school in such a way that they're often missed from official statistics - something the charity call 'the invisibly excluded'. But what effect does being expelled have on young people? And how are the ripples of exclusion felt by the teachers and parents of the children involved?

    Ultrarunner Beth Pascall has just completed one of the most gruelling Lake District fell challenges and set the fastest-known time for a woman: 65 miles in 14 hours 34 minutes - taking 50 minutes off the previous best. How did she go from her first cross-country run at six years old to a speciality distance of 100 miles? And how does she balance being a paediatrician with an inevitably demanding training regime? Jenni is also joined by Dr Nicola Rawlinson, a performance physiologist at Loughborough Sport who's researching female physiology and sports performance for her PhD. She discusses why women perform so well at ultra distances and how our bodies adapt to exercise.

    We discuss the process of recovery after domestic abuse, the way that these relationships can stay with you but also how you can build a new life after. How do those who have survived abuse find their behaviour affected? What do they wish that their friends and family had understood? And how can friends and family can help? With Sue Penna, co-founder of Rockpool who deliver trauma-informed training programmes for those working with survivors of abuse. Sue designed the Recovery Tool Kit programme, delivered to survivors of abuse across the UK, she’s also the author of The Recovery Tool Kit: A 12 week plan to support your journey from Domestic Abuse. And Jennifer Gilmour, an author and advocate for women in abusive relationships, and founder of #AbuseTalk on twitter (live every Wednesday) and the Abuse Talk podcast.

  • The Black Lives Matter movement has shone a light on a number of areas of society where discrimination and prejudice exists beneath the surface. Today we explore what it’s like to be a black woman and work in the music industry. Jacqueline Springer is a music lecturer and journalist. Fleur East is an artist and songwriter who rose to fame after coming second on the X Factor in 2014. Lioness MC is a Grime rapper who has been making songs for over 10 years.

    PMDD, Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, an extreme form of premenstrual syndrome or PMS. affects up to one million women in the UK but is little known, and often misdiagnosed. The BBC has carried out its own research and heard the experiences of 4000 women across the UK. Nearly 3,000 said they’d had suicidal thoughts and around 1,500 self-harmed in the days before their period. To discuss diagnosis and treatment options we hear from Laura Murphy, Director of Education and Awareness for IAPMD (The International Association for Premenstrual Disorders) and Founder of Vicious Cycle : Making PMDD visible, and from Dr Paula Briggs, Consultant in Sexual and Reproductive Health at Liverpool Women’s NHS Foundation Trust.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Producer: Louise Corley
    Editor: Beverley Purcell

  • We often take it for granted that cycling can make you feel a bit saddle sore. But that expectation masks the fact that many women experience real pain when cycling - due to a combination of inappropriate saddles, ill-fitting bikes and a lack of understanding by medical experts of the damage that can be done to the vulva. Now that cycling may soon be on prescription and bikes are soaring in popularity due to the pandemic, how can women ensure they have a pain-free ride? Endurance cyclist and coach Jasmijn Muller talks about what she’s learned from years of serious pain, and specialist women’s cycling physio Bianca Broadbent gives her top troubleshooting tips for everything from saddles to lubricating cream, and not wearing pants.

    The Chartered Counselling Psychologist and former Great British Bake Off Finalist, Kimberley Wilson, joins Jane to discuss her time working in a women’s prison, her mission to improve brain health with simple lifestyle and nutritional tips, while still enjoying an occasional slice of cake.

    Writer and performer Jackie Clune joins Jane to talk about her new novel I’m Just a Teenage Punchbag, a comic tale of menopause, grief and a disillusionment with motherhood.

  • The school summer holidays are underway across the UK – but this year they’re going to be a bit different. Thanks to coronavirus there’s a shortage of childcare and holiday clubs, helpful grandparents are mostly off-limits, parents are already exhausted from juggling home-working and home-school for four months, and teenagers are faced with another six weeks of restricted freedoms. So how are people planning to make it through to September?
    In her book Sex Robots and Vegan Meat, journalist Jenny Kleeman explores seismic changes in four core areas of human experience: birth, food, sex and death. Jane will be talking to Jenny about the implications of fully functioning artificial wombs, what sex robots mean for future relationships between men and women, who the people are shaping the technological changes taking place and how soon these inventions will become an inevitable part of human life.
    Summerland is a new film set during WW2, featuring Alice a folklore investigator debunking myths using science to disprove the existence of magic. She lives a solitary life in a seaside cottage in Sussex but her way of life is turned upside when she has reluctantly to take in a young evacuee .
    Presenter: Jane Garvey
    Interviewed guest: Leann Cross Director, Home Start Greenwich
    Interviewed guest: Emma Thomas, CEO of Young Minds
    Interviewed guest: Jenny Kleeman
    Interviewed guest: Jessica Swale, film director
    Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

  • Known as The Barnsley Nightingale, the folk singer, Kate Rusby talks about her latest album of covers, and recording it with her husband and two young daughters.

    A number of high street retail stores have announced job losses. So many of the shop floor, customer facing jobs are done by women. Retail analyst Catherine Shuttleworth, and Sue Prynn,deputy divisional officer for USDAW's southern division discuss the consequences of these lay-offs.

    In court in New York last week President Trump’s niece, Mary J Trump found out that a temporary restraining order on her book about her uncle was going to be lifted. She spoke about Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created The World’s Most Dangerous Man.

    In the next of our summer series of practical How to guides, how to be a good friend. The broadcaster and beauty expert Sali Hughes, the comedian Jenni Eclair whose new book is Older and Wider – A Survivor’s Guide to the Menopause and Radhika Sanghani, a freelance journalist and novelist discuss.

    The Australian chef, Lara Lee specialises in Indonesian cooking. She cooks the perfect sambal, which is a hot relish found on every Indonesian dinner table.

    Emma Gannon is a podcaster and writer. She’s now written her first novel. In ”Olive”- the central character is thirty three and, like her creator is childfree by choice.

    The gymnast Simone Biles is on the cover of American Vogue’s August 2020 issue, but critics have said the photoshoot highlights why there needs to be more diversity in the photography industry. The photographer Ola Adegoroye and Lazara Storm, who works as a commercial model and is now moving behind the scenes discuss.

    Presenter: Jenni Murray
    Producer: Dianne McGregor

  • In court in New York last week President Trump’s niece, Mary J Trump found out that a temporary restraining order on her book about her uncle was going to be lifted. She joins Jenni to talk about Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created The World’s Most Dangerous Man.

    Editor-in-chief of ELLE magazine and board member of the Social Mobility Commission, Farrah Storr, chats to Jenni about launching their first ever mentoring scheme to find the next generation of creatives. The September issue of the magazine is traditionally the big fashion issue. However, this year the magazine is shifting focus to what’s next and how to rebuild the fashion industry after the pandemic.

    For many households, Tiktok has been a go-to for distraction and entertainment during coronavirus. The video-sharing app has around 800 million active users around the world, but this week, the app is back in the news over concerns over links to the Chinese government regime. We speak to BBC World Service reporter and Tiktok user Sophia Smith-Galer, and journalist and mother of Tiktok users, Zoe Williams about what the app offers and how concerned parents should be.

    The novelist Josephine Cox has died at the age of 82. She wrote more than 60 books and sold over 20 million copies- Her works include Two Sisters, The Beachcomber and Her Father's Sins. She grew up in poverty in a cotton mill house in Blackburn in the 40s and 50s. She was one of 10 children, sleeping six to a bed. She spoke to Jenni in 2001 about the novel the Woman Who Left – based on her own experiences growing up in Blackburn.

    Presented by Jenni Murray
    Produced by Sarah Crawley
    Interviewed guest: Mary J Trump
    Interviewed guest: Farrah Storr
    Interviewed guest: Anya
    Interviewed guest: Maria
    Interviewed guest: Sophia Smith Galer
    Interviewed guest: Zoe Williams
    Interviewed guest: Josephine Cox

  • The folk singer, Kate Rusby also has the nickname, The Barnsley Nightingale. Kate's latest album is covers of pop music you're bound to recognise, but in her own folksy, mellow way. She talks to us about why she did an album of covers, how she recorded it with her husband and girls, and why Susannah Hoff made her cry.

    Seoul in South Korea is known as the plastic surgery capital of the world. There were a million cosmetic procedures last year. Frances Cha, a former travel and culture editor, speaks to Jenni about her new novel ‘If I Had Your Face’ and how she researched it by visiting plastic surgeons and escort bars.

    We talk to the union, Community, about textile factories in Leicester and the recent concerns over low pay and the lack of social distancing in some of them.

    And we Cook The Perfect. Today it's with the Australian chef, Lara Lee. She specialises in Indonesian cooking, due to her family background. She shares recipes that have been passed down the generations. Today, she's cooking the perfect sambal, which is a hot relish found on every Indonesian dinner table.