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  • Susan Rice: Tough Love
    Susan Rice served as the United States ambassador to the United Nations during President Barack Obama’s first term in office. She was later appointed by President Obama as National Security Advisor, a position she held until the end of his presidency.

    Today she is the Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow at the School of International Service at American University, a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times.

    She is the author the New York Times bestseller Tough Love: My Story of Things Worth Fighting For*. In this conversation, Susan and I discuss how her upbringing shaped her skills at mediation, the course corrections she navigated in her career to get better, and how she ensured all perspectives were heard inside President Obama’s National Security Council meetings.
    Key Points

    Susan’s early experience mediating the arguments between her parents helped her develop resilience that would be useful later.
    It’s helpful to separate the behavior from the person. Address inappropriate behavior, and keep it in context with the larger relationship.
    “You can get a long way leading a team, even if many members of the team don’t actually agree with the direction you’re steering towards, if they feel that their advice, perspective, recommendations have truly been heard and appreciated.”
    When facilitating a critical meeting, ensure the principal attendees receive reading points and preparation well in advance.
    Humor, an iron fist, or a velvet glove are all useful tools at the right times. Experience helps you determine what’s best in the moment.
    Wisdom from Susan’s dad: “You can’t let other people define you, for you.”

    Resources Mentioned

    Tough Love: My Story of Things Worth Fighting For* by Susan Rice

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Tough Love in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Abrasive Leaders, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 290)
    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)
    How to Negotiate When Others Have Power, with Kwame Christian (episode 416)
    Leadership in the Midst of Chaos, with Jim Mattis (episode 440)

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  • Colleen Bordeaux: Am I Doing This Right?
    Colleen Bordeaux is a best-selling author, speaker and human capital consultant based in Chicago. She has been published everywhere from the Chicago Sun Times to the Huffington Post and has been endorsed by New York Times columnist and past guest Barry Schwartz and Sunday Times bestselling author Louise Parker.

    Her popular blog has reached more than 200,000 readers and she leads a women’s mastermind group in Chicago. She is the author of the new book: Am I Doing This Right?: A Philosophical Guide to Life in the Age of Overwhelm*.

    In this conversation, Colleen and I discuss the power of relationships — and some of the key principles for cultivating the very best relationships to support you, both professionally and personally.
    Key Points
    You are the same today that you are going to be in five years except for two things: the people with whom you associate, and the books you read. -Charles Jones
    To be nobody but yourself in a world which does its best, day and night, to make you everyone else, is to fight the hardest battle any human being can fight and never stop fighting. -e.e. cummings
    Six steps to improving the relationships you cultivate:

    Assess your own crab-status.
    Take stock of who you’re spending time with.
    Consider who you’re not spending time with, but want to be spending time with.
    Evaluate these relationships based on what you need in your life.
    Eliminate or manage the relationships that aren’t working to create more space for the ones you need.
    Create a relationship mantra (Colleen’s is below):

    My relationships are the best gift I’ve been given, and they are my biggest responsibility. The primary purpose of each of my relationships is to help each other become better versions of ourselves by sharing our authentic experiences, perspectives, and gifts. I will be open to new connections, because that is a source of growth in life—and I will seek and cultivate friendships that bring me to life, and distance myself from relationships that drain me and influence me to betray my values. I aspire to have the kind of quality relationships that inspire others in how they approach developing, growing, and cultivating this important area of their lives. -Colleen Bordeaux
    Resources Mentioned

    Am I Doing This Right?: A Philosophical Guide to Life in the Age of Overwhelm* by Colleen Bordeaux

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Am I Doing This Right? in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279)
    The Way to Build Relationships at Conferences, with Robbie Samuels (episode 346)
    Grow Beyond What is Safe, with John Corcoran (episode 362)
    How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395)

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  • David Marquet: Leadership is Language
    David Marquet is the former commander of the U.S.S. Santa Fe, a nuclear-powered attack submarine. Under David’s command, the ship had an impressive turnaround, achieving the highest retention and operational standings in the Navy.

    David is the author of the bestseller Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders* and has just released his new book, Leadership is Language: The Hidden Power of What You Say and What You Don’t*.

    In this conversation, David and I explore the seven sins of questioning. David shares the story of the ill-fated El Faro and how we can discover better information in leadership by making the shift from self-affirming to self-educating.
    Key Points
    A leading question comes from a place of thinking the person is wrong, or that you have the answer. I hear this a lot from people who think they have the right answer but don’t want to use say so, so they use the Socratic method as a “teaching moment.” It’s annoying and arrogant.
    Self-affirming questions are often binary questions with a special motivation: to coerce agreement and make us feel good about the decision we have already made.
    Seven Ways to Ask Better Questions:

    Instead of questions stacking, try one and done.
    Instead of a teaching moment, try and learning moment.
    Instead of a dirty question, try a clear question.
    Instead of a binary question, start the question with “what” or “how.”
    Instead of a “why” question, try “tell me more.”
    Instead of a self-affirming question, try self-educating questions.
    Instead of jumping to the future, start with the present, past, then future.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leadership is Language: The Hidden Power of What You Say and What You Don’t* by David Marquet
    Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders* by David Marquet
    David Marquet’s website

    Related Episodes

    Leadership Lessons from Challenger, with Allan McDonald (episode 229)
    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363)
    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*.
    Key Points

    Create margin by under-scheduling family and kid commitments. Our default setting is to have a limited about scheduled on weekends.
    We collaborate on schedules by using shared iCloud calendars as a family. Acuity Scheduling* supports both of us professionally in automating scheduling to ensure conflicts are rare.
    We both use systems to capture ideas and activities before we decide to move on them. The Drafts app helps both of us do this quickly. Bonni keeps a “someday/maybe” list and Dave keeps an “incubation” list.
    We get the kids involved with household responsibilities, so everybody learns to contribute and share daily work.
    Take time to put on your leadership hat to make decisions about what’s important. Then, you can manage from there.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide* by Bonni Stachowiak
    Full Focus Planner* from Michael Hyatt
    Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World* by David Epstein
    Who Killed the Weekend? by Katrina Onstad
    Kourosh Dini: Mind, Music, & Productivity
    Streaks app

    Related Episodes

    Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184)
    How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376)
    Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417)

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  • John Maxwell: The Leader’s Greatest Return
    John Maxwell is a #1 New York Times bestselling author, coach, and speaker who has sold more than thirty-one million books in fifty languages. He has been identified as the #1 leader in business by the American Management Association and the most influential leadership expert in the world by Business Insider and Inc. magazine.

    He is the founder of The John Maxwell Company, The John Maxwell Team, EQUIP, and the John Maxwell Leadership Foundation, organizations that have trained millions of leaders from every country of the world. He is the author of the new book The Leader’s Greatest Return: Attracting, Developing, and Multiplying Leaders*.

    In this conversation, John and I discuss his work to develop leaders and the distinctions between motivating followers and motivating leaders. We also explore the seven key motivations of leaders that John has uncovered.
    Key Points

    Successful people have discovered what they are good at. Successful leaders discover what other people are good at.
    “I didn’t have any sudden big hits early in my career. I wasn’t a home run hitter. My secret was to get up to bat every day and just try to get on base consistently.” -John Maxwell
    “You can have everything in life you want if you’ll just help enough other people get what they want.” -Zig Ziglar

    The Seven Motivations of Leaders:

    Purpose: leaders want to do what they were created to do.
    Autonomy: leaders want the freedom to control their lives.
    Relationships: leaders want to do things with others.
    Progress: leaders want to experience personal and professional growth.
    Mastery: leaders want to excel at their work.
    Recognition: leaders want others to appreciate their accomplishments.
    Money: leaders want to be financially secure.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Leader’s Greatest Return: Attracting, Developing, and Multiplying Leaders* by John Maxwell

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from The Leader’s Greatest Return in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Ten Steps to Create a Recognition Program, with Michelle Smith (episode 80)
    Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223)
    The Scientific Secrets of Daily Scheduling, with Daniel Pink (episode 332)

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  • Scott Young: Ultralearning
    Scott’s work is intended to consistently answer this question: what’s the best way to learn? This has led him to take on two year-long experiments in learning: The MIT Challenge, where he attempted to learn MIT’s 4-year computer science curriculum without taking classes, and The Year Without English, where he worked with a friend to learn four languages in one year.

    Scott is the author of the new book, Ultralearning: Master Hard Skills, Outsmart the Competition, and Accelerate Your Career*. In this conversation, Scott and I discuss what ultralearners do differently, the importance of transfer in learning, and four key tactics to enhance directness.
    Key Points

    Transfer is critical for learning, but most formal education programs don’t address it.
    “Many ultralearners who have specialized in a smaller subset of fields are masters at transfer; no doubt this is largely due to their depth of knowledge, which makes transfer easier to accomplish.”
    The key to ultra learning is to enhance directness.

    Four tactics for enhancing directness:

    Project-based learning (producing something)
    Immersive learning (such as language immersion)
    Flight simulator method (like how pilots learn to fly)
    Overkill approach (intentional making it harder than a real use scenario)

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Ultralearning in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337)
    How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376)
    Permission to Be Yourself, with Bar Schwartz (episode 414)
    How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437)

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  • Nancy Duarte: DataStory
    Nancy Duarte is a communication expert who has been featured in Fortune, Time Magazine, Forbes, Fast Company, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and many others. Her firm, Duarte, Inc., is the global leader behind some of the most influential visual messages in business and culture.

    Nancy has written many best-selling books, including Slide:ology*, Resonate*, and Illuminate*. She is the author of the new book DataStory: Explain Data and Inspire Action Through Story*.

    In this conversation, Nancy and I discuss the realities of executive life, how executives are measured, and why you should expect to be grilled when briefing them. With intentional preparation, you’ll be prepared to more successfully influence executives both inside the organization — and with your customers.
    Key Points

    “The higher their level of authority, the more structured and brief your approach should be.” -Nancy Duarte
    Time is an essential asset for executives. Appreciating how much they work to maximize efficiency can help you align better with their world.
    Craft a recommendation that’s brief and easily skimmable. Leave time for questions and expect to be grilled.
    Executives are measured on money (revenue/profit and costs), market (market share and time to market), and exposure (retention and risk).
    Know how executives plan to consume information. Tailor your message and medium to align with these preferences.

    Resources Mentioned

    DataStory: Explain Data and Inspire Action Through Story* by Nancy Duarte
    Duarte DataStory

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from DataStory in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Success on Presentation Day, with David Sparks (episode 159)
    Ignite Change Through Storytelling, with Nancy Duarte and Patti Sanchez (episode 268)
    Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316)
    Get Your Emails Read (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Susan asked for advice on some of the challenges she is facing with an aging workforce.
    Nellie wondered if she should report a difficult situation before she moves onto another opportunity.
    Thiaga asked how Dave manages to read lot of books and how he remembers the key message from these books.
    Robert asked about the best way to position his experience as a faculty member when applying for a role as an administrator.

    Resources Mentioned

    Digital Reading by Bonni Stachowiak
    The First 90 Days* by Michael Watkins
    Big Rocks by Steven Covey

    Related Episodes

    How To Create A Personal Knowledge Management System, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 129)
    How to Lead a 100-Year Life, with Lynda Gratton (episode 266)
    Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306)
    How to Make Your Work More Visible, with John Stepper (episode 397)
    Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421)

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  • Neil Pasricha: You Are Awesome
    Neil Pasricha helps people live happy lives. He is the New York Times-bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and The Book of Awesome series, which has been published in ten countries, spent over five years on bestseller lists, and sold over a million copies.

    He’s a Harvard MBA, one of the most popular TED speakers of all time, and after ten years heading Leadership Development at Walmart he now serves as Director of The Institute for Global Happiness. He is the author of the new book, You Are Awesome: How to Navigate Change, Wrestle with Failure, and Live an Intentional Life.

    In this conversation, Neil and I explore the importance of being uncomfortable to drive professional development. We discuss both of our journeys through mediocrity and how those times helped us to serve many more people today.
    Key Points

    “I know see that my anger stemmed from my deep disappointment in myself.”
    “I didn’t see it then and I wouldn’t see it for at least ten years that the P&G failure helped me to get more comfortable with being uncomfortable."
    “What we often think of evolution as ‘destroying and replacing’ the past is actually transcending and including.”

    Resources Mentioned

    You Are Awesome: How to Navigate Change, Wrestle with Failure, and Live an Intentional Life* by Neil Pasricha
    Neil’s blog

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from You Are Awesome in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273)
    How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334)
    Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337)
    Neil Armstrong’s Other Landings (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Shelley Winner: Restorative Justice
    Shelley Winner is a Restorative Justice Activist whose goal is to change the world, reduce crime, and advocate for justice involved people all while helping companies improve productivity and revenues.

    She is also a technology specialist, is very active in the restorative justice movement in San Francisco and wants to educate the public about the benefits of hiring the formerly incarcerated. Through her work with Winner’s Circle, she is closing the gap between soon to be released inmates and technology companies by developing and delivering training to inmates and helping technology companies create internships for justice involved individuals.

    In this conversation, Shelley shares her story of moving from incarceration to successful employment in the technology industry. We highlight how some organizations are leading in this work and what the research shows about companies that are helping to unlock the formerly incarcerated workforce.
    Key Points

    “There isn't anyone you couldn't learn to love once you've heard their story.” -Fred Rogers
    95% of people incarcerated will be released back to communities. The formerly incarcerated are five times more likely to be unemployed than the general population.
    “Within organizations that have hired those with a criminal record, 82% of managers rate the value workers with a criminal record bring to the organization as similar to or greater than that of those without a record.” -Society for Human Resource Management
    Be an advocate. Research what other organizations are doing on this. Begin by reading the SHRM report.

    Resources Mentioned

    Hiring the Formerly Incarcerated is Best for Your Team (Shelley’s TED talk)
    Winner’s Circle (Shelley’s organization)
    Getting Talent Back to Work by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)
    Out of Prison & Out of Work: Unemployment Among Formerly Incarcerated People by Prison Policy Initiative
    Embracing Formerly Incarcerated Workers: Things HR Should Consider by CareerMinds
    Facts & Trends by The National Reentry Resource Center
    Big Tech's Newest Experiment in Criminal-Justice Reform in The Atlantic
    The Last Mile
    JPMorgan Chase Joins Second Chance Efforts to Reduce Obstacles to Employment

    Related Episodes

    Sin by Silence, with Olivia Klaus (episode 103)
    Leadership Lessons from the Challenger Disaster, with Allan McDonald (episode 229)
    The Choice for Compassion, with Edith Eger (episode 336)
    How to Get Moving, with Scott Harrison (episode 374)

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  • Jim Kirkpatrick: Four Levels of Training Evaluation
    Jim Kirkpatrick is co-owner of Kirkpatrick Partners. He is an expert in training evaluation and the creator of the New World Kirkpatrick Model. He trains and consults for corporate, government, military, and humanitarian organizations around the world.

    Jim co-authored three books with his late father, Don Kirkpatrick, who is credited with creating the Kirkpatrick Model. He also has written four books with Wendy Kirkpatrick, including Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Training Evaluation*.

    In this conversation, Jim and I explore the details of the New World Kirkpatrick Model. Many leaders miss the critical nature of focus on level 4 (results) and level 3 (behavior). We examine these two levels in detail and show leaders how they can take practical steps to link training with results.
    Key Points

    Ask yourself this when considering results: “Is this what the organization exists to do, deliver, or contribute to its customers or society, at a high level?”
    Level 4 (Results): The degree to which targeted outcomes occur as a result of the training and the support and accountability package.
    Level 3 (Behavior): The degree to which participants apply what they learned during training when they are back on the job.
    Level 2 (Learning): The degree to which participants acquire the intended knowledge, skills, attitude, confidence and commitment based on their participation in the training.
    Level 1 (Reaction): The degree to which participants find the training favorable, engaging and relevant to their jobs.

    Resources Mentioned

    Kirkpatrick Community: Free Resources
    Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels of Training Evaluation* by Jim and Wendy Kirkpatrick

    Bonus Audio

    Aligning Training with Business Objectives

    Related Episodes

    Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413)
    Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421)
    Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435)

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  • Mindy Pankoke, Jeff VandenHoek, and Andrew Mugford
    On this SaturdayCast, longtime listeners Mindy, Jeff, and Andrew join Dave to discuss how they’ve worked together to support each other in their leadership development. They share the importance of setting expectations in advance, getting external perspective, and celebrating key milestones.
    Key Points

    Getting people together outside of the organization/industry is helpful for objective perspective.
    “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” -Jim Rohn
    There’s the temptation to think, “What could I possibly offer?” Almost always, each person is able to offer a lot more than they expected.
    Say “thank you” when someone offers something, even if you’re not sure it’s useful.
    It is important to celebrate significant milestones.

    Resources Mentioned

    The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier

    Related Episodes

    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)
    How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395)
    How to Make Your Work More Visible, with John Stepper (episode 397)

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  • Lisa Cummings: Lead Through Strengths
    Lisa Cummings is the founder and CEO of Lead Through Strengths, a firm that exists to help people find and use their strengths at work. Lisa and her team serve large teams and organizations to help them leverage the results of the CliftonStrengths (formerly StrengthsFinder) assessment. She is also the host of the popular Lead Through Strengths podcast.

    In this conversation, Lisa and I discuss the value of bringing continual learning into existing team meetings. We explore several steps for making this a reality and feature her new Stronger Teams training for individuals and teams who want to do this more intentionally. Use code CFL10 for a 10% tuition discount if you decide the program is right for you.
    Key Points

    Consistency of team learning over time, each if for only a few minutes in each interaction, can make substantial progress.
    If possible, begin a meeting with a learning component.
    Help connect the dots for people between their natural talents and the work in front of them in the organization.
    When you ask people to think of others who they admire, be specific.

    Resources Mentioned

    Activity: What Do You Want to Be Remembered For? in PDF format (free membership required).
    StrengthsFinder Stronger Teams training for individuals and teams (use code CFL10 for a 10% tuition discount)
    The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired

    Related Episodes

    Five Effective Ways to Train the People You Lead (episode 31)
    How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293)
    How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358)
    One Alternative to Standing Meetings

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    Robert asked how he could support other leaders in his organization to do better, while also supporting his own career.
    Harrison was wondering how he could handle a situation with a difficult client.
    Gregory wanted to know how to support team members when they are on-site with a customer and not available to connect.
    Chris asked what he could do to get more feedback on what should happen with training and development activities.

    Resources Mentioned

    How to Stop Worry and Start Living* by Dale Carnegie
    The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey

    Related Episodes

    How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91)
    Performance Measurement That Gets Results, with Stacey Barr (episode 419)
    Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435)
    Keep Your Ideas From Being Stolen (Dave’s Journal)

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  • Tasha Eurich: Insight
    Tasha Eurich is an organizational psychologist, researcher, and New York Times best-selling author. Thinkers50 has named her one of the top 30 emerging management thinkers in the world and a top 50 world leader in coaching. She was selected by Marshall Goldsmith for his exclusive “100 Coaches” project to advance the practice of leadership.

    Tasha’s TEDx talks have been viewed more than three million times. She is the author of the book Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think.

    In this conversation, Tasha and I discuss the critical nature of self-awareness and the tendency most people have to stay mum about the truth. She shows us how to discover loving critics who will help you get better — and what you can do and say to support useful feedback coming your way.
    Key Points

    Internal and external self-awareness are both critical — and different. Improving both is important for most leaders.
    “Research shows that people are perfectly willing to tell white lies when they’re easier than the cold, hard truth.”
    Loving critics are people who have mutual trust with you, have sufficient exposure to the behavior you want feedback on and a clear picture of what success looks like, and are willing and able to be brutally honest with you.
    It’s critical to be specific in the questions you ask, seeking feedback. Prime the pump by zeroing in on only one or two areas at a time.

    Bonus Audio

    What Others See

    Resources Mentioned

    5-minute Insight Quiz
    Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think* by Tasha Eurich

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Insight in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143)
    Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond(episode 306)
    How to Process Your 360 Degree Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 341)
    What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438)

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  • Willie Jackson
    Willie Jackson is a diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant and facilitator with ReadySet, a boutique consulting firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a frequent writer and speaker on the topics of workplace equity, global diversity, and inclusive leadership.

    Willie founded an online magazine for black men called Abernathy in 2015, growing the publication from initial concept to over 400 articles and thousands of subscribers. He also served as Technical Lead of Seth Godin’s altMBA program.

    In this conversation, Willie and I discuss getting started on the journey with diversity and inclusion, what leaders can do to be more mindful, and some of the missteps that I’ve made along the way.
    Key Points

    Most of us have good intentions — and intentions alone do not ensure we make the impact we want.
    We don’t rise to the level of our ambition. We sink to the level of our training.
    You will make mistakes, regardless of how mindful and intentional you are.

    Bonus Audio

    The Language of Inclusivity

    Resources

    Scene on Radio podcast
    White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism* by Robin DiAngelo
    Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century* by Dorothy Roberts
    The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration* by Isabel Wilkersons
    Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America* by Ibram Kendi
    How to Be an Antiracist* by Ibram Kendi

    Related Episodes

    How to Handle Workplace Bullying, with Jill Morgenthaler (episode 172)
    How to Tame Workplace Incivility, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 210)
    How to Make Inclusion Happen, with Deepa Purushothaman (episode 307)

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  • Jim Mattis: Call Sign Chaos
    Jim Mattis served more than four decades as an infantry officer in the United States Marines, rising to the rank of 4-star general. In 2017, he was nearly unanimously confirmed as the 26th Secretary of Defense of the United States, a position he held for almost two years.

    Today, he is a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the author of the new book with Bing West: Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead*.

    In this conversation, Jim and I discuss his career in the Marines and the leadership lessons that emerged during combat. Jim shares the mistake he made in soliciting support for his plan to capture Osama Bin Laden in Tora Bora and discusses how he handled disagreements on strategy in Fallujah. Finally, Jim recommends three books and reflects on the greatest threat to America today.
    Key Points

    Creating “focused telescopes” outside the normal chain of command were useful in discovering concerns that might not otherwise have become known.
    Keep key stakeholders in the loop with these three questions: What do I know? Who needs to know? Have I told them?
    “You cannot order someone to abandon a spiritual burden they’ve been wrestling with.”
    Even in a war zone, command was only a small portion of the daily tasks. Most of the time was spent coaching.
    “History teaches that we face nothing new under the sun.” Books will help you take advantage of the accumulated experiences of leaders who came before you.

    Resources Mentioned

    Meditations* by Marcus Aurelius
    Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant* by Ulysses S. Grant and Mark Twain
    Long Walk to Freedom* by Nelson Mandela

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Call Sign Chaos in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)
    Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422)
    How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430)

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  • Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed
    Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions.
    Listener Questions

    David asked about how to replace his manager who’s had 20 years of experience.
    Said wondered what he should do to overcome the fear of leading someone smarter than him.
    James asked about the best ways to prepare how more opportunities to influence others.

    Resources Mentioned

    Leaders Need “User Manuals” – and What I Learned By Writing Mine
    What If You Had to Write a "User Manual" About Your Leadership Style?
    Business Model Generation* by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur

    Related Episodes

    Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59)
    An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149)
    Do This for a Productive Week (episode 180)
    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)
    How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294)
    The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349)
    Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405)

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  • Lori Gottlieb: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone
    Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and New York Times bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone*. In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly Dear Therapist advice column and contributes regularly to The New York Times and many other publications.

    Lori has written hundreds of articles related to psychology and culture, many of which have become viral sensations. She is a sought-after expert in media appearing on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and NPR’s “Fresh Air.”

    In this conversation, Lori and I explore what to do with our feelings, how make the transition from idiot compassion towards wise compassion, and where a therapist can help. When a therapist is the right resource, Lori teaches us how to gain the most from therapy by stepping into both vulnerability and accountability.
    Key Points

    It’s important to make the transition from “idiot compassion” to wise compassion — and to find others who can do that for us.
    Sometimes people say they want to stop the difficult feelings, but you can’t mute some feelings without muting all of them.
    We keep secrets from our therapists — and we keep secrets from ourselves. The more we are able to be vulnerable, the more that people are able to help ourselves.
    Insight alone is not valuable without accountability to do better with new insight.
    What matters most in the success of therapy is the relationship with your therapist, more so than any other factor or credentials.

    Resources Mentioned

    Maybe You Should Talk to Someone* by Lori Gottlieb
    Dear Therapist in The Atlantic

    Related Episodes

    How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232)
    Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297)
    The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344)

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  • Art Markman: Bring Your Brain to Work
    Art Markman is the Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organizations, which brings the humanities and the social behavioral sciences to people in business.

    Along with Bob Duke, Art hosts the radio show Two Guys on Your Head for KUT Radio in Austin, also available as a podcast. He’s the author of many books, most recently: Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career*.

    In this conversation, Art and I explore the science behind what we know and how we can both better recognize what we don’t know and increase our knowledge in that area. Research shows that others are one of our best sources of knowledge and we discuss how to make intentional connections through mentoring to accomplish this.
    Key Points

    Metacognition is the awareness of one’s own knowledge.
    The Dunning-Kruger explains how sometimes feels like we know more about something than we actually do.
    The success of expert generalists demonstrates the value of leveraging connections with others in the organization and industry.
    The most powerful source of knowledge is the people around you.
    Traditional mentoring programs aren’t ideal since they are inorganic.
    Seek these five kinds of people when building a team that can mentor you: coach, superstar, connector, librarian, and teammate.

    Resources Mentioned

    Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career* by Art Markman

    Book Notes
    Download my highlights from Bring Your Brain to Work in PDF format (free membership required).
    Related Episodes

    How to Find a Mentor (episode 105)
    How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279)
    What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398)

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